Jv Mission CDA

Digital Blood Bank

Digital Blood Bank BMLT III Sem , BMLT IV Sem , BMLT VII Sem, BMLT VIII Sem , BMLT IX Sem , BMLT X Sem

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Showing 37 Submission(s)
  • RISHITA OJHA 253 Hrs 32 Min 04 Sec

    #rishita ojha # jv-u/18/2047 # bsc.mlt 7semester #Jayoti Vidyapeeth women University # blood bank.Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.blood banking include blood donation that is a process through which blood donor has a specified amount of blood draw for the purpose of storage in a blood bank and for subsequent blood transfusion blood donation may be done in a blood bank or in blood donation camp the process of blood donation involved selection of blood donor by screening actual donation of blood and brief recovery period after blood donation the safe translation practice start with proper selection of blood donor if donor are not properly screen blood can become a medium of transmission of infection like HIV hepatitis b and c syphilis and malaria types of donor blood donation are of three main types first whole blood donation collection of one unit of 350 ml of whole blood in a anticoagulant solution autologous donation donation for subsequent transfusion to self appraisal donation removal of whole blood for a donation separation and rotation of desire portion and retaining and remaining portion to the donor there are three main types of whole whole blood donation voluntary professional replacement voluntary a voluntary blood donors donate blood out of his her own free will and out of sense of duty or responsibility towards the community and voluntary is the issue of voluntary donor card which can be present free blood unit if blood is required for himself or close family members professional of paid paid donor donate blood for money high risk behaviour medical history search for a donation should be completely discharged replacement blood donor is a friend of relative of the recipient who donate blood unit is credited to the patient blood unit that has been donated the replacement the blood unit used for the patient. Before to go to donate: • Get enough sleep at the night of the donationEat a balanced meal. Before donating about two hours. • You must drink fluids (caffeine-free) a little more than usual. When attending to the blood bank, they Recording the donor information such as name, age "older than 18 years," and then the card number, address .... Etc. (this information to contact you if needed), and you must fill the form Card. • Determine Blood Type: (of the four factions accepted).Measuring the concentration of hemoglobin (Hb): Using finger. • Weight: (preferably a weight of 50 kg). • Measuring the pulse. • Blood pressure: (less than 160/90). Donate blood during the past three months • All types of anemia other than iron deficiency anemia. • Heart disease and rheumatic fever. • Chronic respiratory diseases. • Chronic hypertension. • Viral hepatitis. • Diabetes mellitus. • Cases of enlarged liver. • Cases of kidney failure. • Convulsions cases epilepsy and frequent fainting. • Increase or decrease the thyroid gland secretions. • Pregnancy. • Bleeding disease. • Genetic diseases. • Mental illness. • Any surgical operations during the three-month period. • Unexpected loss of weight and loss of appetite. • Night sweating. Night fever. Obtaining the blood: There are two main methods of obtaining blood from a donor. The most frequent is to simply take the blood from a vein as whole blood. This blood is typically separated into parts, usually red blood cells and plasma, since most recipients need only a specific component for transfusions. A typical donation is 450 millilitres of whole blood, though 500 millilitre donations are also common. The other method is to draw blood from the donor, separate it using a centrifuge or a filter, store the desired part, and return the rest to the donor. This process is called apheresis There is a app where where that anyone who donate through the American Red Cross can create a Donor account to the Red Cross blood donation app online and get detail of patient

  • AANCHAL JAIN 253 Hrs 48 Min 46 Sec

    #aanchal jain # jv-u/18/2210 # bsc.mlt 7semester #Jayoti Vidyapeeth womens University # blood donation is a process through which blood donor has a specified amount of blood draw for the purpose of storage in a blood bank and for subsequent blood transfusion blood donation may be done in a blood bank or in blood donation camp the process of blood donation involved selection of blood donor by screening actual donation of blood and brief recovery period after blood donation the safe translation practice start with proper selection of blood donor if donor are not properly screen blood can become a medium of transmission of infection like HIV hepatitis b and c syphilis and malaria types of donor blood donation are of three main types first whole blood donation collection of one unit of 350 ml of whole blood in a anticoagulant solution autologous donation donation for subsequent transfusion to self appraisal donation removal of whole blood for a donation separation and rotation of desire portion and retaining and remaining portion to the donor there are three main types of whole whole blood donation voluntary professional replacement voluntary a voluntary blood donors donate blood out of his her own free will and out of sense of duty or responsibility towards the community and voluntary is the issue of voluntary donor card which can be present free blood unit if blood is required for himself or close family members professional of paid paid donor donate blood for money high risk behaviour medical history search for a donation should be completely discharged replacement blood donor is a friend of relative of the recipient who donate blood unit is credited to the patient blood unit that has been donated the replacement the blood unit used for the patient. Before to go to donate: • Get enough sleep at the night of the donation. • Eat a balanced meal. Before donating about two hours. • You must drink fluids (caffeine-free) a little more than usual. When attending to the blood bank, they Recording the donor information such as name, age "older than 18 years," and then the card number, address .... Etc. (this information to contact you if needed), and you must fill the form Card. • Determine Blood Type: (of the four factions accepted).Measuring the concentration of hemoglobin (Hb): Using finger. • Weight: (preferably a weight of 50 kg). • Measuring the pulse. • Blood pressure: (less than 160/90). Donate blood during the past three months • All types of anemia other than iron deficiency anemia. • Heart disease and rheumatic fever. • Chronic respiratory diseases. • Chronic hypertension. • Viral hepatitis. • Diabetes mellitus. • Cases of enlarged liver. • Cases of kidney failure. • Convulsions cases epilepsy and frequent fainting. • Increase or decrease the thyroid gland secretions. • Pregnancy. • Bleeding disease. • Genetic diseases. • Mental illness. • Any surgical operations during the three-month period. • Unexpected loss of weight and loss of appetite. • Night sweating. Night fever. Obtaining the blood: There are two main methods of obtaining blood from a donor. The most frequent is to simply take the blood from a vein as whole blood. This blood is typically separated into parts, usually red blood cells and plasma, since most recipients need only a specific component for transfusions. A typical donation is 450 millilitres of whole blood, though 500 millilitre donations are also common. The other method is to draw blood from the donor, separate it using a centrifuge or a filter, store the desired part, and return the rest to the donor. This process is called apheresis.

  • KAJAL KESHRI 270 Hrs 16 Min 27 Sec

    #kajal keshri#jv-ul/19/3135#bsc.mlt7semester#Jayoti Vidyapeeth womens University#blood donation is a process through which blood donor has a specified amount of blood draw for the purpose of storage in a blood bank and for subsequent blood transfusion blood donor may be done in a blood bank or in blood donation camp the process of blood donation involved selection of blood donor by screening actual donation of blood and brief recovery period after blood donation the safe translation practice start with proper selection of blood donor if donor are not properly screen blood can become a medium of transmission of infection like HIV hepatitis b and c syphilis and malaria types of donor blood donation are of three main types first whole blood donation collection of one unit of 350 ml of whole blood in a anticoagulant solution autologous donation donation for subsequent transfusion to self appraisal donation removal of whole blood for a donation separation and rotation of desire portion and retaining and remaining portion to the donor there are three main types of whole whole blood donation voluntary professional replacement voluntary a voluntary blood donors donate blood out of his her own free will and out of sense of duty or responsibility towards the community and voluntary is the issue of voluntary donor card which can be present free blood unit if blood is required for himself or close family members professional of paid doughnut paid or professional donor donate blood for money high risk behaviour medical history search for a donation should be completely discharged replacement oe replacement blood donor is a friend of relative of the recipient who donate blood unit is credited to the patient blood unit that has been donated the replacement the blood unit used for the patient T hey are also suggest the four types of blood donation which is Plasma platelets red cells and also whole blood those different components in used blood in many uses by the help of references to nation which removal of the whole blood of the donor separation and rotation of this side portion and retaining the remaining portion of the blood Donor s s auto lock installation which is donation of subsequent transfusion to self donation that individual give for their own nose for example before surgery and also donate whole blood in one unit or 350 ml of whole blood in the anti-government solution. There is a app where where that anyone who donate through the American Red Cross can create a Donor account to the Red Cross blood donation app online and will be able to view their blood type under their profile

  • MANSI SAXENA 294 Hrs 33 Min 50 Sec

    #mansi saxena # jv-ul/19/3137#bsc.mlt # jayoti Vidyapeeth womens university # blood donation made and in the blood bank or in the blood donation camp web-based donation management system is a management system website that enable individuals who want to donate blood to the help the needed it also enable hospital to record and store the data for the people who won to communicate with them and it also provide a centralisation bank blood database to enhance and improve donate blood digital experience by understanding the problem is face with regard to the decrease in repeat Donor improving its features and proposing new feature in the existing app which contribute to the overall business goal of increasing repeat. They are also suggest the four types of blood donation which is Plasma platelets red cells and also whole blood those different components in used blood in many uses by the help of references to nation which removal of the whole blood of the donor separation and rotation of this side portion and retaining the remaining portion of the blood Donor s s auto lock installation which is donation of subsequent transfusion to self donation that individual give for their own nose for example before surgery and also donate whole blood in one unit or 350 ml of whole blood in the anti-government solution. There is a app where where that anyone who donate through the American Red Cross can create a Donor account to the Red Cross blood donation app online and will be able to view their blood type under their profile

  • SONALI 294 Hrs 46 Min 33 Sec

    #Sonali #Bscmlt7semester#scholarno-202318#jayoti Vidyapeeth womens University#blood donation in India collection of blood processing storage and preparation of blood components and derivations are regulated by food and drugs administration FD a blood is regarded as a drug of the drug and cosmetics act 1948 by the FDA and all the blood banks to obtain and follow the FDA guidelines Blood donation is the process through which a blood donor has a specific amount of blood drawn for the purpose of storage in a blood bank and for subsequent blood transfusion blood donation may be done in a blood bank and in blood donation camp the process of blood donation in wall selection of blood donor by screening of blood blood donation are are main three types whole blood donation collection of 1 unit and 350 ml of whole blood in anticoagulant solution autologous donation donation for subsequent transmission to cells phrases donation removal of whole blood for a donor separation and retardation of the donor portion criteria for selection of donor muesli healthy individual can donate blood mentally alert and physically fit their to principal that must be keep in mind where donor is selected the doughnut collection process should not be harmful to donor the donor blood should not harmful to the recipient the donor should fulfill the following requirements such as the donor Shelby in the age group of 18 to 16 years weight not not less than 45 kg temperature of the donor should be normal and there should be absence of any chronic disease pulse rate should be regular and between 72to100 per minute the systolic and diastolic blood pressure are within normal limits without medications hemoglobin should not be less than 12.5 gram per deciliter interval between two suspicious donation should be minimum three months that owner should be free from any disease transmission bye blood donation for transfusion the donor should not have history of any of the disease such as hepatitis cancer heart disease liver disease asthma tuberculosis etc

  • ANCHAL RAHA 295 Hrs 40 Min 30 Sec

    #Anchalraha#scholarno-2019077#bsc.mlt7semester#Jayoti Vidyapeeth womens University#blood donation is a process through which blood donor has a specified amount of blood draw for the purpose of storage in a blood bank and for subsequent blood transfusion blood donor may be done in a blood bank or in blood donation camp the process of blood donation involved selection of blood donor by screening actual donation of blood and brief recovery period after blood donation the safe translation practice start with proper selection of blood donor if donor are not properly screen blood can become a medium of transmission of infection like HIV hepatitis b and c syphilis and malaria types of donor blood donation are of three main types first whole blood donation collection of one unit of 350 ml of whole blood in a anticoagulant solution autologous donation donation for subsequent transfusion to self appraisal donation removal of whole blood for a donation separation and rotation of desire portion and retaining and remaining portion to the donor there are three main types of whole whole blood donation voluntary professional replacement voluntary a voluntary blood donors donate blood out of his her own free will and out of sense of duty or responsibility towards the community and voluntary is the issue of voluntary donor card which can be present free blood unit if blood is required for himself or close family members professional of paid doughnut paid or professional donor donate blood for money high risk behaviour medical history search for a donation should be completely discharged replacement oe replacement blood donor is a friend of relative of the recipient who donate blood unit is credited to the patient blood unit that has been donated the replacement the blood unit used for the patient

  • AZRUNA 320 Hrs 31 Min 37 Sec

    #azruna khan bsc mlt 5th sem enrollment no jv-u/20/4133 jayoti vidyapeeth womens university jaipur blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.Most blood donors are volunteers. However, sometimes, a patient may want to donate blood a couple of weeks before undergoing surgery, so that his or her blood is available in case of a blood transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Most blood donors are volunteers. But you may also donate blood several weeks before having surgery. This is so that your blood is available in case you need a transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation.Good health of the donor must be fully ensured. The universally accepted criteria for donor selection are: Age between 18 and 60 years Haemoglobin - not less than 12.5 g/Dl Pulse - between 50 and 100/minute with no irregularities Blood Pressure -Systolic 100-180 mm Hg and Diastolic 50 - 100 mm Hg Temperature - Normal (oral temperature not exceeding 37.50C) Who should not donate People who might not be able to donate blood include those who:- have used needles to take drugs, steroids, or other substances that a doctor has not prescribed have engaged in sex for money or drugs test positive for certain conditions, such as HIV. have taken certain medications are male and have had sexual contact with other males in the past 3 months Red blood cells or packed cells is transfused to patients with anemia/iron deficiency. It also helps to improve the oxygen saturation in blood. It can be stored at 1.0 °C-6.0 °C for 35–45 days. Platelet transfusion is transfused to those who suffer from low platelet count. Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5–7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it is bit expensive than regular. Plasma transfusion is indicated to patients with liver failure, severe infections or serious burns. Fresh frozen plasma can be stored at a very low temperature of -25 °C for up to 12 months. The separation of plasma from a donors blood is called plasmapheresis.

  • MANISHA RAHA 320 Hrs 33 Min 34 Sec

    #manisha raha #BSCMLT 5th SEM #ENROLLMENTno jv-u/20/4135 #The Topic Of Blood banking.#JYOTI VIDHYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY #TOPIC;-Digital blood bank What is blood banking?Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.Facts about blood banking According to the American Association of Blood Banks as of 2013:About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day. The number of blood units donated is about 13.6 million a year. About 6.8 million volunteers are blood donors each year. Each unit of blood is broken down into components, such as red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitated AHF, and platelets. One unit of whole blood, once its separated, may be transfused to several patients, each with different needs. Annually, more than 21 million blood components are transfused. Who are the blood donors? Most blood donors are volunteers. However, sometimes, a patient may want to donate blood a couple of weeks before undergoing surgery, so that his or her blood is available in case of a blood transfsion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Volunteer blood donors must pass certain criteria, including the following: Must be at least 16 years of age, or in accordance with state law Must be in good health Must weigh at least 110 pounds Must pass the physical and health history exam given before donation Some states permit people younger than 16 or 17 years to donate blood, with parental consent. What tests are done in blood banking? A certain set of standard tests are done in the lab once blood is donated, including, but not limited to, the following: Typing: ABO group (blood type) Rh typing (positive or negative antigen) Screening for any unexpected red blood cell antibodies that may cause problems in the recipient Screening for current or past infections, including: Hepatitis viruses B and C Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) I and II Syphilis West Nile virus Chagas disease Irradiation to blood cells is performed to disable any T-lymphocytes present in the donated blood. (T-lymphocytes can cause a reaction when transfused, but can also cause graft-versus-host problems with repeated exposure to foreign cells.) Leukocyte-reduced blood has been filtered to remove the white blood cells that contain antibodies that can cause fevers in the recipient of the transfusion. (These antibodies, with repeated transfusions, may also increase a recipients risk of reactions to subsequent transfusions.) What are the blood types? According to the American Association of Blood Banks, distribution of blood types in the U.S. includes the following: O Rh-positive - 39% A Rh-positive - 31% B Rh-positive - 9% O Rh-negative - 9% A Rh-negative - 6% AB Rh-positive - 3% B Rh-negative - 2% AB Rh-negative - 1%

  • ISHITA BAJPAI 320 Hrs 34 Min 02 Sec

    ISHITABAJPAI #ISHITA BAJPAI #BSCMLT 3RD SEM #ENROLLMENT 202495 TOPIC OF CDA IS: DIGITAL BLOOD BANK. A place where blood is collected from donors, typed, separated into components, stored, and prepared for transfusion to recipients. A blood bank may be a separate free-standing facility or part of a larger laboratory in a hospital Charles Drew led the Blood for Britain program, and developed the National Blood Bank. At age 37, Charles Drew was at the height of his career, and yet he faced the decision to leave it all behind.. The blood bank plays an important role in patient care. Transfusion-related errors have serious consequence for patients, including death. Proper identification of the patient and blood products is critical in avoiding such transfusion-related reactions. Once separated, one unit of blood can be transfused to different patients to cater to their individual needs. A blood bank breaks down every unit of blood into components like red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitate AHF, and platelets. How does blood bank store blood? The blood is stored in refrigerators at 2 to 6 degrees C. Each unit of whole blood normally is separated into several components. Red blood cells may be stored under refrigeration for a maximum of 42 days, or they may be frozen for up to 10 years. ... Commercial manufacturers commonly produce these blood products. How does blood bank store blood? The blood is stored in refrigerators at 2 to 6 degrees C. Each unit of whole blood normally is separated into several components. Red blood cells may be stored under refrigeration for a maximum of 42 days, or they may be frozen for up to 10 years. ... Commercial manufacturers commonly produce these blood products.

  • IQRA ZAHID 320 Hrs 36 Min 25 Sec

    #jvn iqra azahid b.sc mlt 5 sem #enrollment no- jv-ul/20/4134 # jayoti vidyapeeth womens university jaipur Jv mission Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.Most blood donors are volunteers. However, sometimes, a patient may want to donate blood a couple of weeks before undergoing surgery, so that his or her blood is available in case of a blood transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Most blood donors are volunteers. But you may also donate blood several weeks before having surgery. This is so that your blood is available in case you need a transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation.Good health of the donor must be fully ensured. The universally accepted criteria for donor selection are: Age between 18 and 60 years Haemoglobin - not less than 12.5 g/Dl Pulse - between 50 and 100/minute with no irregularities Blood Pressure -Systolic 100-180 mm Hg and Diastolic 50 - 100 mm Hg Temperature - Normal (oral temperature not exceeding 37.50C) Who should not donate People who might not be able to donate blood include those who:- have used needles to take drugs, steroids, or other substances that a doctor has not prescribed have engaged in sex for money or drugs test positive for certain conditions, such as HIV. have taken certain medications are male and have had sexual contact with other males in the past 3 months Red blood cells or packed cells is transfused to patients with anemia/iron deficiency. It also helps to improve the oxygen saturation in blood. It can be stored at 1.0 °C-6.0 °C for 35–45 days. Platelet transfusion is transfused to those who suffer from low platelet count. Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5–7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it is bit expensive than regular. Plasma transfusion is indicated to patients with liver failure, severe infections or serious burns. Fresh frozen plasma can be stored at a very low temperature of -25 °C for up to 12 months. The separation of plasma from a donors blood is called plasmapheresis.

  • SONALI 320 Hrs 37 Min 45 Sec

    #sonali #jv-ul/20/4136 #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university blood bank There are still a lot of Blood Banks worldwide that although they employ locally some Laboratory application software, however, their activities are still based on manually filled up pre-printed template paper forms. A typical Hospital Blood Bank administration schema comprises of the manual documentation and management of various routine functions. We have investigated [1] the employed paper-forms in major Hospitals, as well as, their specifications in national and transnational legal documents, and we have developed a MS Access based related Databases system that allows for, first, the reproduction of the familiar to the personnel lay-out of the employed paper-forms, second, the digital archiving of all transactions, third, the transmission of demands and responses through electronic mail, and finally the full searchability of the system. A secure password protected Internet-accessible Dynamic Medical and Administrative Text and Image Library that supports remote Regional Routine Administration, as well as, Crisis and Disaster management, completes the system. Upon this Dynamic Library an educational module, comprising of means such as on-line lecture-slides, lecture notes, digital video material, self-evaluation quizzes, and other important information, developed or made available, to cover important subjects of Transfusion Medicine. THANK YOU

  • SONALI 320 Hrs 39 Min 19 Sec

    blood bank There are still a lot of Blood Banks worldwide that although they employ locally some Laboratory application software, however, their activities are still based on manually filled up pre-printed template paper forms. A typical Hospital Blood Bank administration schema comprises of the manual documentation and management of various routine functions. We have investigated [1] the employed paper-forms in major Hospitals, as well as, their specifications in national and transnational legal documents, and we have developed a MS Access based related Databases system that allows for, first, the reproduction of the familiar to the personnel lay-out of the employed paper-forms, second, the digital archiving of all transactions, third, the transmission of demands and responses through electronic mail, and finally the full searchability of the system. A secure password protected Internet-accessible Dynamic Medical and Administrative Text and Image Library that supports remote Regional Routine Administration, as well as, Crisis and Disaster management, completes the system. Upon this Dynamic Library an educational module, comprising of means such as on-line lecture-slides, lecture notes, digital video material, self-evaluation quizzes, and other important information, developed or made available, to cover important subjects of Transfusion Medicine. THANK YOU

  • MANISHA RAHA 320 Hrs 41 Min 49 Sec

    #azruna khan#bsc mlt 5th sem #enrollment jv-u/20/4133 #topic digital blood bank # jayoti vidhyapeth womens university #blood bank, organization that collects, stores, processes, and transfuses blood. During World War I it was demonstrated that stored blood could safely be used, allowing for the development of the first blood bank in 1932. Before the first blood banks came into operation, a physician determined the blood types of the patient’s relatives and friends until the proper type was found, performed the crossmatch, bled the donor, and gave the transfusion to the patient. In the 1940s the discovery of many blood types and of several crossmatching techniques led to the rapid development of blood banking as a specialized field and to a gradual shift of responsibility for the technical aspects of transfusion from practicing physicians to technicians and clinical pathologists. The practicality of storing fresh blood and blood components for future needs made possible such innovations as artificial kidneys, heart-lung pumps for open-heart surgery, and exchange transfusions for infants with erythroblastosis fetalis. Whole blood is donated and stored in units of about 450 ml (slightly less than one pint). Whole blood can be stored only for a limited time, but various components (e.g., red blood cells and plasma) can be frozen and stored for a year or longer. Therefore, most blood donations are separated and stored as components by the blood bank. These components include platelets to control bleeding; concentrated red blood cells to correct anemia; and plasma fractions, such as fibrinogen to aid clotting, immune globulins to prevent and treat a number of infectious diseases, and serum albumin to augment the blood volume in cases of shock. Thus, it is possible to serve the varying needs of five or more patients with a single blood donation. Despite such replacement programs, many blood banks face continual problems in obtaining sufficient donations. The chronic shortage of donors has been alleviated somewhat by the development of apheresis, a technique by which only a desired blood component is taken from the donor’s blood, with the remaining fluid and blood cells immediately transfused back into the donor. This technique allows the collection of large amounts of a particular component, such as plasma or platelets, from a single donor.

  • Maisara Jan 320 Hrs 44 Min 25 Sec

    MAISARA JAN.. NAME:# MAISARA JAN . #BSC MLT 3RD SEM . #ENROLLMENT 202623 TOPIC OF CDA : DIGITAL BLOOD BANK.. The Digital- Blood bank enables electronic monitoring of blood collection, testing, storage and final use and disposal .Blood bank is a place where blood is collected and stored before it is used for transfusions. Blood banking takes place in the lab. This is to make sure that donated blood and blood products are safe before they are used. Blood banking also determines the blood .type - A blood bank may be a separate free-standing facility or part of a larger laboratory in a hospital. -Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases. Facts about blood banking According to the American Red Cross: About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day. The number of blood units donated is about 13.6 million a year. About 6.8 million volunteers are blood donors each year. Each unit of blood is broken down into components. These are red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitated AHF (cryo), a white blood cell called a granulocyte, and platelets. One unit of whole blood and its parts may be transfused to several people. Each person may have a different need. More than 21 million blood components are transfused each year. What tests are done in blood banking? Certain standard tests are done in the lab once blood is donated. These include: Typing. This is blood type. Blood can be A, B, AB, or O. Rh typing. This can be Rh positive or Rh negative. Screening for any unexpected red blood cell antibodies. These antibodies may cause problems in the person getting the blood Screening for current or past infections. The list includes: Hepatitis viruses B and C HIV Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) I and II Syphilis West Nile virus Chagas disease .What are the blood types? According to the AABB, blood types make up the following portions of the U.S. population: O Rh-positive - 39% A Rh-positive - 30% B Rh-positive - 9% O Rh-negative - 9% A Rh-negative - 6% AB Rh-positive - 4% B Rh-negative - 2% AB Rh-negative - 1%

  • SUFIYA PARWEEN 320 Hrs 47 Min 02 Sec

    #Sufiya Parveen #Bmlt 3 Semester #Enrollment No- Jv-u/20/4146 #Jayoti Vidyapeeth Women University #Jv Mission A blood bank is a center where blood gathered as a result of blood donation is stored and preserved for later use in blood transfusion. The term "blood bank" typically refers to a division of a hospital where the storage of blood product occurs and where proper testing is performed (to reduce the risk of transfusion related adverse events). However, it sometimes refers to a collection center, and some hospitals also perform collection. Blood banking includes tasks related to blood collection, processing, testing, separation, and storage. #History:-While the first blood transfusions were made directly from donor to receiver before coagulation, it was discovered that by adding anticoagulant and refrigerating the blood it was possible to store it for some days, thus opening the way for the development of blood banks. John Braxton Hicks was the first to experiment with chemical methods to prevent the coagulation of blood at St Marys Hospital, London, in the late 19th century. His attempts, using phosphate of soda, however, were unsuccessful.The first non-direct transfusion was performed on March 27, 1914, by the Belgian doctor Albert Hustin, though this was a diluted solution of blood. The Argentine doctor Luis Agote used a much less diluted solution in November of the same year. Both used sodium citrate as an anticoagulant. #Types of blood transfused :-Whole blood, which is blood transfused without separation. Red blood cells or packed cells is transfused to patients with anemia/iron deficiency. It also helps to improve the oxygen saturation in blood. It can be stored at 1.0 °C-6.0 °C for 35–45 days. Platelet transfusion is transfused to those who suffer from low platelet count. Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5–7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it is bit expensive than regular. Plasma transfusion is indicated to patients with liver failure, severe infections or serious burns. Fresh frozen plasma can be stored at a very low temperature of -25 °C for up to 12 months. The separation of plasma from a donors blood is called plasmapheresis.

  • KHUSHBOO KUMAWAT 320 Hrs 52 Min 22 Sec

    #KHUSHBOO KUMAWAT #BSCMLT !ST SEM ENROLLMENTno jv-u/21/5033 The Topic Of Blood banking.#JYOTI VIDHYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY #TOPIC;-Digital blood bank There are still a lot of Blood Banks worldwide that although they employ locally some Laboratory application software, however, their activities are still based on manually filled up pre-printed template paper forms. A typical Hospital Blood Bank administration schema comprises of the manual documentation and management of various routine functions. We have investigated [1] the employed paper-forms in major Hospitals, as well as, their specifications in national and transnational legal documents, and we have developed a MS Access based related Databases system that allows for, first, the reproduction of the familiar to the personnel lay-out of the employed paper-forms, second, the digital archiving of all transactions, third, the transmission of demands and responses through electronic mail, and finally the full searchability of the system. A secure password protected Internet-accessible Dynamic Medical and Administrative Text and Image Library that supports remote Regional Routine Administration, as well as, Crisis and Disaster management, completes the system. Upon this Dynamic Library an educational module, comprising of means such as on-line lecture-slides, lecture notes, digital video material, self-evaluation quizzes, and other important information, developed or made available, to cover important subjects of Transfusion Medicine. THANK YOU

  • SITA JAJORIYA 321 Hrs 05 Min 37 Sec

    #SITA JAJORIYA#BSCMLT7THSEMBlood banking refers to the process of collecting, separating, and storing blood. The first U.S. blood bank was established in 1936. Today, blood banks collect blood and separate it into its various components so they can be used most effectively according to the needs of the patient. Red blood cells carry oxygen, platelets help the blood clot, and plasma has specific proteins that allow proper regulation of coagulation and healing. Although research has yielded drugs that help peoples bone marrow produce new blood cells more rapidly, the bodys response time can still take weeks, thus donated blood remains an important and more immediate life-saving resource. Blood is the vital connection to having a healthy body, and according to the American Red Cross, nearly 5 million people receive blood transfusions each year. Thanks to years of research, much progress has been made towards making transfusions safer and more effective.Routine blood storage is 42 days or 6 weeks for stored packed red blood cells (also called "StRBC" or "pRBC"), by far the most commonly transfused blood product, and involves refrigeration but usually not freezing. There has been increasing controversy about whether a given product units age is a factor in transfusion efficacy, specifically on whether "older" blood directly or indirectly increases risks of complications.[17][18] Studies have not been consistent on answering this question,[19] with some showing that older blood is indeed less effective but with others showing no such difference; nevertheless, as storage time remains the only available way to estimate quality status or loss, a first-in-first-out inventory management approach is standard presently.[20] It is also important to consider that there is large variability in storage results for different donors, which combined with limited available quality testing, poses challenges to clinicians and regulators seeking reliable indicators of quality for blood products and storage systems.[21] Transfusions of platelets are comparatively far less numerous, but they present unique storage/management issues. Platelets may only be stored for 7 days,[22] due largely to their greater potential for contamination, which is in turn due largely to a higher storage temperature. RBC storage lesion Insufficient transfusion efficacy can result from red blood cell (RBC) blood product units damaged by so-called storage lesion—a set of biochemical and biomechanical changes which occur during storage. With red cells, this can decrease viability and ability for tissue oxygenation.[23] Although some of the biochemical changes are reversible after the blood is transfused,[24] the biomechanical changes are less so,[25] and rejuvenation products are not yet able to adequately reverse this phenomenon.[26] Current regulatory measures are in place to minimize RBC storage lesion—including a maximum shelf life (currently 42 days), a maximum auto-hemolysis threshold (currently 1% in the US), and a minimum level of post-transfusion RBC survival in vivo (currently 75% after 24 hours).[27] However, all of these criteria are applied in a universal manner that does not account for differences among units of product;[21] for example, testing for the post-transfusion RBC survival in vivo is done on a sample of healthy volunteers, and then compliance is presumed for all RBC units based on universal (GMP) processing standards. RBC survival does not guarantee efficacy, but it is a necessary prerequisite for cell function, and hence serves as a regulatory proxy. Opinions vary as to the best way to determine transfusion efficacy in a patient in vivo.[28] In general, there are not yet any in vitro tests to assess quality deterioration or preservation for specific units of RBC blood product prior to their transfusion, though there is exploration of potentially relevant tests based on RBC membrane properties such as erythrocyte deformability[29] and erythrocyte fragility (mechanical).[30] Many physicians have adopted a so-called "restrictive protocol"—whereby transfusion is held to a minimum—due in part to the noted uncertaintie

  • KAJAL KESHRI 321 Hrs 08 Min 41 Sec

    #kajal keshri #BMLT 7th semester #enrollment no-jv-ul/19/3135 #jayoti vidyapeeth womens university #topic-digital blood bank #TOWARDS “DIGITAL BLOOD-BANKING” B. Spyropoulos1, M. Botsivaly1, A. Tzavaras1, P. Spyropoulou21Medical Instrumentation Technology Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Athens, Greece, 2Blood Bank, General Hospital of Piraeus “Tzaneion”, Piraeus, Greece ABSTRACT This paper constitutes a status report of the attempts of our group during the last decade, to contribute to the design and the implementation of a universal Information System with integrated Web-Services, covering the most important Aspects of modern Transfusion Medicine, i.e. Medical-Managerial and Educational issues, Clinical and Laboratory Quality Assurance, Hemovigilance, Financial-Managerial topics, and finally, post Transfusion Continuity of Care. Keywords— Digital Blood-Banking; Hemovigilance; Web-Services; Quality Assurance; Semantically annotated Web. 1. INTRODUCTION The Transfusion of Blood and Blood components are essential for health-care service delivery. Blood components are often used in life threatening situations of severely ill patients and, therefore, high standards of quality and safety of Blood components have to be assured. These high standards can only be achieved by applying the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice during the collection, preparation, storage, dispatch, quality control and quality assurance of these products. Important instruments for the safety improvement of the Blood and Blood products supply constitute, first, clinical Guidelines that lead the Transfusion practice, second, an inspection system to control the compliance to the guidelines, and finally, a hemovigilance program that supervises the Blood supply chain, and offers counter actions to eventual threats for the safety of Blood product recipients. Obviously, for the achievement of these goals the employment of Clinical and Laboratory Information Systems based on mutually and reliably communicating computer networks is indispensable. There is a variety of hardware and software systems employed in Blood-Banking worldwide. Every year, blood banks employ different strategies to recruit and retain blood donors (promotional activities, posters and leaflets) . However, such recruitment has had limited success insofar as voluntary, unpaid blood donations are concerned. In 79 countries, more than 90% of blood supplies come from voluntary donors, whereas in 56 countries, more than 50% of supplies come from relatives or paid donors . Thus, an understanding of the factors that motivate or dissuade people from donating blood is crucial to the development of blood donation and collection strategies. Motivations for Blood Donation Various studies have analysed the factors that motivate donors to give blood [17,18,19,20]. Research has put their motives into three main groups: altruism, self-interest, and response to direct or social appeal. Altruism is considered to be the main motive in the majority of the studies, and it is based on the desire to help others by donating without receiving anything in return . Self-interest motives are based on the pursuit of some kind of individual interest, such as getting satisfaction from helping others or being rewarded for donations . Lastly, response to direct or social appeal motives are extrinsic ones originating from marketing campaigns run by blood collection institutions, or from the influence exerted by reference groups. Participation in Collaborative Digital Platforms The advent of digital platforms (e.g., Uber, Airbnb and Blooders.org) has profoundly transformed both economic activity and exchanges between people who have no commercial intention. Within this context, field research has pointed out the collaborative nature of this new set of online resource circulation systems, which enable people to both obtain and provide, temporarily or permanently, valuable resources or services through direct interaction with other people or through a mediator. A provider is a person who provides a specific resource or service, either directly to an obtainer or indirectly through a mediator. Thus, collaborative provision refers to re-exchange or reuse, such as reselling or second-hand purchase, subleasing, swapping, free or paid donation, and reconditioning or refurbishing . Following this approach, we understand collaborative blood donation as blood donation between a person and a healthcare institution mediated by a digital platform

  • MS. MANISHA CHOUDHARY 321 Hrs 09 Min 51 Sec

    #manisha choudhary#enrollment no.-jv-u/18/2746#bmlt 7th sem.#jayoti vidyapeeth womens university# topic-digital blood bank Skip Navigation Health Conditions and Diseases Treatments, Tests and Therapies Wellness and Prevention Caregiving Health Home Treatments, Tests and Therapies blood in bags Blood Banking Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Pinterest Share via Email Print this Page What is blood banking? Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases. Facts about blood banking According to the American Association of Blood Banks as of 2013: About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day. The number of blood units donated is about 13.6 million a year. About 6.8 million volunteers are blood donors each year. Each unit of blood is broken down into components, such as red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitated AHF, and platelets. One unit of whole blood, once its separated, may be transfused to several patients, each with different needs. Annually, more than 21 million blood components are transfused. Who are the blood donors? Most blood donors are volunteers. However, sometimes, a patient may want to donate blood a couple of weeks before undergoing surgery, so that his or her blood is available in case of a blood transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Volunteer blood donors must pass certain criteria, including the following: Must be at least 16 years of age, or in accordance with state law Must be in good health Must weigh at least 110 pounds Must pass the physical and health history exam given before donation Some states permit people younger than 16 or 17 years to donate blood, with parental consent. What tests are done in blood banking? A certain set of standard tests are done in the lab once blood is donated, including, but not limited to, the following: Typing: ABO group (blood type) Rh typing (positive or negative antigen) Screening for any unexpected red blood cell antibodies that may cause problems in the recipient Screening for current or past infections, including: Hepatitis viruses B and C Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) I and II Syphilis West Nile virus Chagas disease Irradiation to blood cells is performed to disable any T-lymphocytes present in the donated blood. (T-lymphocytes can cause a reaction when transfused, but can also cause graft-versus-host problems with repeated exposure to foreign cells.) Leukocyte-reduced blood has been filtered to remove the white blood cells that contain antibodies that can cause fevers in the recipient of the transfusion. (These antibodies, with repeated transfusions, may also increase a recipients risk of reactions to subsequent transfusions.) What are the blood types? According to the American Association of Blood Banks, distribution of blood types in the U.S. includes the following: O Rh-positive - 39% A Rh-positive - 31% B Rh-positive - 9% O Rh-negative - 9% A Rh-negative - 6% AB Rh-positive - 3% B Rh-negative - 2% AB Rh-negative - 1% What are the components of blood? While blood, or one of its components, may be transferred, each component serves many functions, including the following: Red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to the tissues in the body and are commonly used in the treatment of anemia. Platelets. They help the blood to clot and are used in the treatment of leukemia and other forms of cancer. White blood cells. These cells help to fight infection, and aid in the immune process. Plasma. The watery, liquid part of the blood in which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are suspended. Plasma is needed to carry the many parts of the blood through the bloodstream. Plasma serves many functions, including the following:

  • SHRUTI SONI 321 Hrs 13 Min 26 Sec

    #SHRUTI SONI #BSC. MLT # ENROLL.NO=Jv-u/18/2239 #JYOTI VIDHYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY #TOPIC;-Digital blood bank There are still a lot of Blood Banks worldwide that although they employ locally some Laboratory application software, however, their activities are still based on manually filled up pre-printed template paper forms. A typical Hospital Blood Bank administration schema comprises of the manual documentation and management of various routine functions. We have investigated [1] the employed paper-forms in major Hospitals, as well as, their specifications in national and transnational legal documents, and we have developed a MS Access based related Databases system that allows for, first, the reproduction of the familiar to the personnel lay-out of the employed paper-forms, second, the digital archiving of all transactions, third, the transmission of demands and responses through electronic mail, and finally the full searchability of the system. A secure password protected Internet-accessible Dynamic Medical and Administrative Text and Image Library that supports remote Regional Routine Administration, as well as, Crisis and Disaster management, completes the system. Upon this Dynamic Library an educational module, comprising of means such as on-line lecture-slides, lecture notes, digital video material, self-evaluation quizzes, and other important information, developed or made available, to cover important subjects of Transfusion Medicine.

  • RISHITA OJHA 321 Hrs 14 Min 13 Sec

    #rishita ojha #BSC MLT 7TH SMESTER #ENROLLMENT NO. JV-U/18/2047 # JAYOTI VIDYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY# JV MISSIONWorld Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is held on June 14 each year. The event was organised for the first time in 2005, by a joint initiative of the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products, and to thank blood donors for their voluntary, life-saving gifts of blood. World Blood Donor Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Chagas Disease Day, World Tuberculosis Day, World Immunization Week, World Patient Safety Day, World Malaria Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day.Transfusion of blood and blood products helps and save millions of lives every year. It can help patients who suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It also has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. Access to safe and sufficient blood and blood products can help reduce rates of death and disability due to severe bleeding during delivery and after childbirth. In many countries, there is not an adequate supply of safe blood, and blood services face the challenge of making sufficient blood available, while also ensuring its quality and safety. An adequate supply can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary unpaid blood donors. The WHOs goal is for all countries to obtain all their blood supplies from voluntary unpaid donors by 2020. In 2014, 60 countries have their national blood supplies based on 99-100% voluntary unpaid blood donations, with 73 countries still largely dependent on family and paid donors.It emphasizes thanking of blood donors who save lives every day through their blood donations and inspires more people all over the world to donate blood voluntarily and regularly with the slogan “Give freely, give often". Blood donation matters. This year campaign pays attention to stories from people whose lives have been saved through blood donation. Activities include memorable events, meetings, publication of relevant stories on media, scientific conferences, publication of articles on national, regional and international scientific journals, and other activities that would help in encouraging the title of this years World Blood Donor Day.The host country for World Blood Donor Day 2015 is China through its blood center in Shanghai,Shanghai Blood Centre, also the WHO Collaborating Center for Blood Transfusion Services. THANK YOU.

  • RISHITA OJHA 321 Hrs 15 Min 22 Sec

    #rishita ojha #BSC MLT 7TH SMESTER #ENROLLMENT NO. JV-U/18/2047 # JAYOTI VIDYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY# JV MISSIONWorld Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is held on June 14 each year. The event was organised for the first time in 2005, by a joint initiative of the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products, and to thank blood donors for their voluntary, life-saving gifts of blood. World Blood Donor Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Chagas Disease Day, World Tuberculosis Day, World Immunization Week, World Patient Safety Day, World Malaria Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day.Transfusion of blood and blood products helps and save millions of lives every year. It can help patients who suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It also has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. Access to safe and sufficient blood and blood products can help reduce rates of death and disability due to severe bleeding during delivery and after childbirth. In many countries, there is not an adequate supply of safe blood, and blood services face the challenge of making sufficient blood available, while also ensuring its quality and safety. An adequate supply can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary unpaid blood donors. The WHOs goal is for all countries to obtain all their blood supplies from voluntary unpaid donors by 2020. In 2014, 60 countries have their national blood supplies based on 99-100% voluntary unpaid blood donations, with 73 countries still largely dependent on family and paid donors.It emphasizes thanking of blood donors who save lives every day through their blood donations and inspires more people all over the world to donate blood voluntarily and regularly with the slogan “Give freely, give often". Blood donation matters. This year campaign pays attention to stories from people whose lives have been saved through blood donation. Activities include memorable events, meetings, publication of relevant stories on media, scientific conferences, publication of articles on national, regional and international scientific journals, and other activities that would help in encouraging the title of this years World Blood Donor Day.The host country for World Blood Donor Day 2015 is China through its blood center in Shanghai,Shanghai Blood Centre, also the WHO Collaborating Center for Blood Transfusion Services. THANK YOU.

  • SANA SAGHIR 321 Hrs 15 Min 48 Sec

    #sana saghir# jv-ul/19/3136 #departent of physiotherpy and diagnostics# bscMLT7thsemBlood donation is a voluntary procedure that can help save the lives of others. There are several types of blood donation. Each type helps meet different medical needs. Whole blood donation This is the most common type of blood donation, during which you donate about a pint (about half a liter) of whole blood. The blood is then separated into its components — red cells, plasma and sometimes platelets. Apheresis During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, including red cells, plasma and platelets, and return unused components back to you. Platelet donation (plateletpheresis) collects only platelets — the cells that help stop bleeding by clumping and forming plugs (clotting) in blood vessels. Donated platelets are commonly given to people with clotting problems or cancer and people who will have organ transplants or major surgeries. Double red cell donation allows you to donate a concentrated amount of red blood cells. Red blood cells deliver oxygen to your organs and tissues. Donated red blood cells are typically given to people with severe blood loss, such as after an injury or accident, and people with sickle cell anemia. Plasma donation (plasmapheresis) collects the liquid portion of the blood (plasma). Plasma helps blood clot and contains antibodies that help fight off infections. Plasma is commonly given to people in emergency and trauma situations to help stop bleeding Millions of people need blood transfusions each year. Some may need blood during surgery. Others depend on it after an accident or because they have a disease that requires blood components. Blood donation makes all of this possible. There is no substitute for human blood — all transfusions use blood from a donor. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Risks Blood donation is safe. New, sterile disposable equipment is used for each donor, so theres no risk of contracting a bloodborne infection by donating blood. If youre a healthy adult, you can usually donate a pint (about half a liter) of blood without endangering your health. Within a few days of a blood donation, your body replaces the lost fluids. And after two weeks, your body replaces the lost red blood cells. How you prepare Eligibility requirements To be eligible to donate whole blood, plasma or platelets, you must be: In good health. At least 16 or 17 years old, depending on the law in your state. Some states allow legal minors to donate with parent permission. While theres no legal upper age limit, policies may vary between individual donor centers. At least 110 pounds (about 50 kilograms). Able to pass the physical and health-history assessments. Eligibility requirements differ slightly between different types of blood donation. Food and medications Before your blood donation: Get plenty of sleep the night before you plan to donate. Eat a healthy meal before your donation. Avoid fatty foods, such as a hamburger, fries or ice cream. Drink plenty of water before the donation. Check to see if any medications you are taking or recently took would prevent you from donating. For example, if you are a platelet donor, you must not take aspirin for two days prior to donating. Talk to your doctor before discontinuing any medications. Wear a shirt with sleeves that can be rolled up. What you can expect Before the procedure Before you can donate blood, you will be asked to fill out a confidential medical history that includes questions about behaviors known to carry a higher risk of bloodborne infections — infections that are transmitted through the blood. Because of the risk of bloodborne infections, not everyone can donate blood. The following are a few high-risk groups that are not eligible to donate blood: Anyone who has used injected drugs, steroids or another substance not prescribed by a doctor in the past three months Men who have had sexual contact with other men in the past three months Anyone who has a congenital coagulation factor deficiency Anyone who has had a positive test for HIV Anyone who has engaged in sex for money or drugs in the past three months Anyone who, in the past 12 months, has had close contact with — lived with or had sexual contact with — a person who has viral hepatitis Anyone who has had babesiosis, a rare and severe tick-borne disease, or the parasitic infection Chagas disease Anyone who has taken the psoriasis medication etretinate (Tegison), which has been discontinued in the U.S. Anyone who has risk factors for the degenerative brain disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) Anyone who spent three months or more in the United Kingdom from 1980 through 1996 Anyone who received a blood transfusion in the United Kingdom or France from 1980 to the present Anyone who has spent time that adds up to five years or more in France or Ireland from 1980 to 2001 You will also have a brief physical exam, which includes checking your blood pressure, pulse and temperature. A small sample of blood is taken from a finger prick and is used to check the oxygen-carrying component of your blood (hemoglobin level). If your hemoglobin concentration is normal and youve met all the other screening requirements, you can donate blood. COVID-19 concerns The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hasnt been shown to be transmitted through blood transfusions. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests waiting to donate blood for at least 14 days after a positive diagnostic test for COVID-19 without symptoms or for at least 14 days after symptoms of COVID-19 have completely cleared up. Those who have tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies but didnt have a diagnostic test and never developed symptoms can donate without a waiting period or having a diagnostic test done before donation. If you get a nonreplicating, inactivated or mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine, you can donate blood without a waiting period. However, if a live attenuated viral COVID-19 vaccine becomes available and you get it, wait 14 days after being vaccinated before donating blood. If you arent sure what type of vaccine you got, wait 14 days before donating blood. During the procedure You lie or sit in a reclining chair with your arm extended on an armrest. If you have a preference for which arm or vein is used, share it. A blood pressure cuff or tourniquet is placed around your upper arm to fill your veins with more blood. This makes the veins easier to see and easier to insert the needle into, and also helps fill the blood bag more quickly. Then the skin on the inside of your elbow is cleaned. A new, sterile needle is inserted into a vein in your arm. This needle is attached to a thin, plastic tube and a blood bag. Once the needle is in place, you tighten your fist several times to help the blood flow from the vein. Blood initially is collected into tubes for testing. When these have been collected, blood is allowed to fill the bag, about a pint (about half a liter). The needle is usually in place about 10 minutes. When complete, the needle is removed, a small bandage is placed on the needle site and a dressing is wrapped around your arm. Another method of donating blood becoming increasingly common is apheresis. During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, such as red cells, plasma and platelets. This process allows more of a single component to be collected. It takes longer than standard blood donation — typically up to two hours. After the procedure After donating, you sit in an observation area, where you rest and eat a light snack. After 15 minutes, you can leave. After your blood donation: Drink extra fluids. Avoid strenuous physical activity or heavy lifting for about five hours. If you feel lightheaded, lie down with your feet up until the feeling passes. Keep your bandage on and dry for the next five hours. If you have bleeding after removing the bandage, put pressure on the site and raise your arm until the bleeding stops. If bruising occurs, apply a cold pack to the area periodically during the first 24 hours. Consider adding iron-rich foods to your diet to replace the iron lost with blood donation. Contact the blood donor center or your doctor if you: Forgot to report any important health information. Have signs and symptoms of an illness, such as a fever, within several days after your blood donation. Are diagnosed with COVID-19 within 48 hours after donating blood. Results Testing Your blood will be tested to determine your blood type and your Rh factor. Blood type is classified as A, B, AB or O. The Rh factor refers to the presence or absence of a specific antigen — a substance capable of stimulating an immune response — in the blood. Youll be classified as Rh positive or Rh negative, meaning you do or dont carry the antigen. This information is important because your blood type and Rh factor must be compatible with the blood type and Rh factor of the person receiving your blood. Your blood will also be tested for bloodborne diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV. If these tests are negative, the blood is distributed for use in hospitals and clinics. If any of these tests are positive, the donor center notifies you, and your blood is discarded. Blood donation About Doctors & Departments Advertisement Blood donation is a voluntary procedure that can help save the lives of others. There are several types of blood donation. Each type helps meet different medical needs. Whole blood donation This is the most common type of blood donation, during which you donate about a pint (about half a liter) of whole blood. The blood is then separated into its components — red cells, plasma and sometimes platelets. Apheresis During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, including red cells, plasma and platelets, and return unused components back to you. Platelet donation (plateletpheresis) collects only platelets — the cells that help stop bleeding by clumping and forming plugs (clotting) in blood vessels. Donated platelets are commonly given to people with clotting problems or cancer and people who will have organ transplants or major surgeries. Double red cell donation allows you to donate a concentrated amount of red blood cells. Red blood cells deliver oxygen to your organs and tissues. Donated red blood cells are typically given to people with severe blood loss, such as after an injury or accident, and people with sickle cell anemia. Plasma donation (plasmapheresis) collects the liquid portion of the blood (plasma). Plasma helps blood clot and contains antibodies that help fight off infections. Plasma is commonly given to people in emergency and trauma situations to help stop bleeding Why its done You agree to have blood drawn so that it can be given to someone who needs a blood transfusion. Millions of people need blood transfusions each year. Some may need blood during surgery. Others depend on it after an accident or because they have a disease that requires blood components. Blood donation makes all of this possible. There is no substitute for human blood — all transfusions use blood from a donor. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Risks Blood donation is safe. New, sterile disposable equipment is used for each donor, so theres no risk of contracting a bloodborne infection by donating blood. If youre a healthy adult, you can usually donate a pint (about half a liter) of blood without endangering your health. Within a few days of a blood donation, your body replaces the lost fluids. And after two weeks, your body replaces the lost red blood cells. How you prepare Eligibility requirements To be eligible to donate whole blood, plasma or platelets, you must be: In good health. At least 16 or 17 years old, depending on the law in your state. Some states allow legal minors to donate with parent permission. While theres no legal upper age limit, policies may vary between individual donor centers. At least 110 pounds (about 50 kilograms). Able to pass the physical and health-history assessments. Eligibility requirements differ slightly between different types of blood donation. Food and medications Before your blood donation: Get plenty of sleep the night before you plan to donate. Eat a healthy meal before your donation. Avoid fatty foods, such as a hamburger, fries or ice cream. Drink plenty of water before the donation. Check to see if any medications you are taking or recently took would prevent you from donating. For example, if you are a platelet donor, you must not take aspirin for two days prior to donating. Talk to your doctor before discontinuing any medications. Wear a shirt with sleeves that can be rolled up. What you can expect Before the procedure Before you can donate blood, you will be asked to fill out a confidential medical history that includes questions about behaviors known to carry a higher risk of bloodborne infections — infections that are transmitted through the blood. Because of the risk of bloodborne infections, not everyone can donate blood. The following are a few high-risk groups that are not eligible to donate blood: Anyone who has used injected drugs, steroids or another substance not prescribed by a doctor in the past three months Men who have had sexual contact with other men in the past three months Anyone who has a congenital coagulation factor deficiency Anyone who has had a positive test for HIV Anyone who has engaged in sex for money or drugs in the past three months Anyone who, in the past 12 months, has had close contact with — lived with or had sexual contact with — a person who has viral hepatitis Anyone who has had babesiosis, a rare and severe tick-borne disease, or the parasitic infection Chagas disease Anyone who has taken the psoriasis medication etretinate (Tegison), which has been discontinued in the U.S. Anyone who has risk factors for the degenerative brain disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) Anyone who spent three months or more in the United Kingdom from 1980 through 1996 Anyone who received a blood transfusion in the United Kingdom or France from 1980 to the present Anyone who has spent time that adds up to five years or more in France or Ireland from 1980 to 2001 You will also have a brief physical exam, which includes checking your blood pressure, pulse and temperature. A small sample of blood is taken from a finger prick and is used to check the oxygen-carrying component of your blood (hemoglobin level). If your hemoglobin concentration is normal and youve met all the other screening requirements, you can donate blood. COVID-19 concerns The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hasnt been shown to be transmitted through blood transfusions. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests waiting to donate blood for at least 14 days after a positive diagnostic test for COVID-19 without symptoms or for at least 14 days after symptoms of COVID-19 have completely cleared up. Those who have tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies but didnt have a diagnostic test and never developed symptoms can donate without a waiting period or having a diagnostic test done before donation. If you get a nonreplicating, inactivated or mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine, you can donate blood without a waiting period. However, if a live attenuated viral COVID-19 vaccine becomes available and you get it, wait 14 days after being vaccinated before donating blood. If you arent sure what type of vaccine you got, wait 14 days before donating blood. During the procedure You lie or sit in a reclining chair with your arm extended on an armrest. If you have a preference for which arm or vein is used, share it. A blood pressure cuff or tourniquet is placed around your upper arm to fill your veins with more blood. This makes the veins easier to see and easier to insert the needle into, and also helps fill the blood bag more quickly. Then the skin on the inside of your elbow is cleaned. A new, sterile needle is inserted into a vein in your arm. This needle is attached to a thin, plastic tube and a blood bag. Once the needle is in place, you tighten your fist several times to help the blood flow from the vein. Blood initially is collected into tubes for testing. When these have been collected, blood is allowed to fill the bag, about a pint (about half a liter). The needle is usually in place about 10 minutes. When complete, the needle is removed, a small bandage is placed on the needle site and a dressing is wrapped around your arm. Another method of donating blood becoming increasingly common is apheresis. During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, such as red cells, plasma and platelets. This process allows more of a single component to be collected. It takes longer than standard blood donation — typically up to two hours. After the procedure After donating, you sit in an observation area, where you rest and eat a light snack. After 15 minutes, you can leave. After your blood donation: Drink extra fluids. Avoid strenuous physical activity or heavy lifting for about five hours. If you feel lightheaded, lie down with your feet up until the feeling passes. Keep your bandage on and dry for the next five hours. If you have bleeding after removing the bandage, put pressure on the site and raise your arm until the bleeding stops. If bruising occurs, apply a cold pack to the area periodically during the first 24 hours. Consider adding iron-rich foods to your diet to replace the iron lost with blood donation. Contact the blood donor center or your doctor if you: Forgot to report any important health information. Have signs and symptoms of an illness, such as a fever, within several days after your blood donation. Are diagnosed with COVID-19 within 48 hours after donating blood. Results Testing Your blood will be tested to determine your blood type and your Rh factor. Blood type is classified as A, B, AB or O. The Rh factor refers to the presence or absence of a specific antigen — a substance capable of stimulating an immune response — in the blood. Youll be classified as Rh positive or Rh negative, meaning you do or dont carry the antigen. This information is important because your blood type and Rh factor must be compatible with the blood type and Rh factor of the person receiving your blood. Your blood will also be tested for bloodborne diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV. If these tests are negative, the blood is distributed for use in hospitals and clinics. If any of these tests are positive, the donor center notifies you, and your blood is discarded. Blood donation Blood donation is a voluntary procedure that can help save the lives of others. There are several types of blood donation. Each type helps meet different medical needs. Whole blood donation This is the most common type of blood donation, during which you donate about a pint (about half a liter) of whole blood. The blood is then separated into its components — red cells, plasma and sometimes platelets. Apheresis During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, including red cells, plasma and platelets, and return unused components back to you. Platelet donation (plateletpheresis) collects only platelets — the cells that help stop bleeding by clumping and forming plugs (clotting) in blood vessels. Donated platelets are commonly given to people with clotting problems or cancer and people who will have organ transplants or major surgeries. Double red cell donation allows you to donate a concentrated amount of red blood cells. Red blood cells deliver oxygen to your organs and tissues. Donated red blood cells are typically given to people with severe blood loss, such as after an injury or accident, and people with sickle cell anemia. Plasma donation (plasmapheresis) collects the liquid portion of the blood (plasma). Plasma helps blood clot and contains antibodies that help fight off infections. Plasma is commonly given to people in emergency and trauma situations to help stop bleeding. Why its done You agree to have blood drawn so that it can be given to someone who needs a blood transfusion. Millions of people need blood transfusions each year. Some may need blood during surgery. Others depend on it after an accident or because they have a disease that requires blood components. Blood donation makes all of this possible. There is no substitute for human blood — all transfusions use blood from a donor. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Risks Blood donation is safe. New, sterile disposable equipment is used for each donor, so theres no risk of contracting a bloodborne infection by donating blood. If youre a healthy adult, you can usually donate a pint (about half a liter) of blood without endangering your health. Within a few days of a blood donation, your body replaces the lost fluids. And after two weeks, your body replaces the lost red blood cells. How you prepare Eligibility requirements To be eligible to donate whole blood, plasma or platelets, you must be: In good health. At least 16 or 17 years old, depending on the law in your state. Some states allow legal minors to donate with parent permission. While theres no legal upper age limit, policies may vary between individual donor centers. At least 110 pounds (about 50 kilograms). Able to pass the physical and health-history assessments. Eligibility requirements differ slightly between different types of blood donation. Food and medications Before your blood donation: Get plenty of sleep the night before you plan to donate. Eat a healthy meal before your donation. Avoid fatty foods, such as a hamburger, fries or ice cream. Drink plenty of water before the donation. Check to see if any medications you are taking or recently took would prevent you from donating. For example, if you are a platelet donor, you must not take aspirin for two days prior to donating. Talk to your doctor before discontinuing any medications. Wear a shirt with sleeves that can be rolled up. What you can expect Before the procedure Before you can donate blood, you will be asked to fill out a confidential medical history that includes questions about behaviors known to carry a higher risk of bloodborne infections — infections that are transmitted through the blood. Because of the risk of bloodborne infections, not everyone can donate blood. The following are a few high-risk groups that are not eligible to donate blood: Anyone who has used injected drugs, steroids or another substance not prescribed by a doctor in the past three months Men who have had sexual contact with other men in the past three months Anyone who has a congenital coagulation factor deficiency Anyone who has had a positive test for HIV Anyone who has engaged in sex for money or drugs in the past three months Anyone who, in the past 12 months, has had close contact with — lived with or had sexual contact with — a person who has viral hepatitis Anyone who has had babesiosis, a rare and severe tick-borne disease, or the parasitic infection Chagas disease Anyone who has taken the psoriasis medication etretinate (Tegison), which has been discontinued in the U.S. Anyone who has risk factors for the degenerative brain disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) Anyone who spent three months or more in the United Kingdom from 1980 through 1996 Anyone who received a blood transfusion in the United Kingdom or France from 1980 to the present Anyone who has spent time that adds up to five years or more in France or Ireland from 1980 to 2001 You will also have a brief physical exam, which includes checking your blood pressure, pulse and temperature. A small sample of blood is taken from a finger prick and is used to check the oxygen-carrying component of your blood (hemoglobin level). If your hemoglobin concentration is normal and youve met all the other screening requirements, you can donate blood. COVID-19 concerns The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hasnt been shown to be transmitted through blood transfusions. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests waiting to donate blood for at least 14 days after a positive diagnostic test for COVID-19 without symptoms or for at least 14 days after symptoms of COVID-19 have completely cleared up. Those who have tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies but didnt have a diagnostic test and never developed symptoms can donate without a waiting period or having a diagnostic test done before donation. If you get a nonreplicating, inactivated or mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine, you can donate blood without a waiting period. However, if a live attenuated viral COVID-19 vaccine becomes available and you get it, wait 14 days after being vaccinated before donating blood. If you arent sure what type of vaccine you got, wait 14 days before donating blood. During the procedure You lie or sit in a reclining chair with your arm extended on an armrest. If you have a preference for which arm or vein is used, share it. A blood pressure cuff or tourniquet is placed around your upper arm to fill your veins with more blood. This makes the veins easier to see and easier to insert the needle into, and also helps fill the blood bag more quickly. Then the skin on the inside of your elbow is cleaned. A new, sterile needle is inserted into a vein in your arm. This needle is attached to a thin, plastic tube and a blood bag. Once the needle is in place, you tighten your fist several times to help the blood flow from the vein. Blood initially is collected into tubes for testing. When these have been collected, blood is allowed to fill the bag, about a pint (about half a liter). The needle is usually in place about 10 minutes. When complete, the needle is removed, a small bandage is placed on the needle site and a dressing is wrapped around your arm. Another method of donating blood becoming increasingly common is apheresis. During apheresis, you are hooked up to a machine that can collect and separate blood components, such as red cells, plasma and platelets. This process allows more of a single component to be collected. It takes longer than standard blood donation — typically up to two hours. After the procedure After donating, you sit in an observation area, where you rest and eat a light snack. After 15 minutes, you can leave. After your blood donation: Drink extra fluids. Avoid strenuous physical activity or heavy lifting for about five hours. If you feel lightheaded, lie down with your feet up until the feeling passes. Keep your bandage on and dry for the next five hours. If you have bleeding after removing the bandage, put pressure on the site and raise your arm until the bleeding stops. If bruising occurs, apply a cold pack to the area periodically during the first 24 hours. Consider adding iron-rich foods to your diet to replace the iron lost with blood donation. Contact the blood donor center or your doctor if you: Forgot to report any important health information. Have signs and symptoms of an illness, such as a fever, within several days after your blood donation. Are diagnosed with COVID-19 within 48 hours after donating blood. Results Testing Your blood will be tested to determine your blood type and your Rh factor. Blood type is classified as A, B, AB or O. The Rh factor refers to the presence or absence of a specific antigen — a substance capable of stimulating an immune response — in the blood. Youll be classified as Rh positive or Rh negative, meaning you do or dont carry the antigen. This information is important because your blood type and Rh factor must be compatible with the blood type and Rh factor of the person receiving your blood. Your blood will also be tested for bloodborne diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV. If these tests are negative, the blood is distributed for use in hospitals and clinics. If any of these tests are positive, the donor center notifies you, and your blood is discarded. Clinical trials Explore Mayo Clinic studies of tests and procedures to help prevent, detect, treat or manage conditions.

  • AANCHAL JAIN 321 Hrs 16 Min 25 Sec

    #AANCHALJAIN #BSC MLT 7TH SMESTER #ENROLLMENT NO. JV-U/18/2210 # JAYOTI VIDYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY# JV MISSIONWorld Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is held on June 14 each year. The event was organised for the first time in 2005, by a joint initiative of the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products, and to thank blood donors for their voluntary, life-saving gifts of blood. World Blood Donor Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Chagas Disease Day, World Tuberculosis Day, World Immunization Week, World Patient Safety Day, World Malaria Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day.Transfusion of blood and blood products helps and save millions of lives every year. It can help patients who suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It also has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. Access to safe and sufficient blood and blood products can help reduce rates of death and disability due to severe bleeding during delivery and after childbirth. In many countries, there is not an adequate supply of safe blood, and blood services face the challenge of making sufficient blood available, while also ensuring its quality and safety. An adequate supply can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary unpaid blood donors. The WHOs goal is for all countries to obtain all their blood supplies from voluntary unpaid donors by 2020. In 2014, 60 countries have their national blood supplies based on 99-100% voluntary unpaid blood donations, with 73 countries still largely dependent on family and paid donors.It emphasizes thanking of blood donors who save lives every day through their blood donations and inspires more people all over the world to donate blood voluntarily and regularly with the slogan “Give freely, give often". Blood donation matters. This year campaign pays attention to stories from people whose lives have been saved through blood donation. Activities include memorable events, meetings, publication of relevant stories on media, scientific conferences, publication of articles on national, regional and international scientific journals, and other activities that would help in encouraging the title of this years World Blood Donor Day.The host country for World Blood Donor Day 2015 is China through its blood center in Shanghai,Shanghai Blood Centre, also the WHO Collaborating Center for Blood Transfusion Services. THANK YOU.

  • Sikha Pandy 321 Hrs 16 Min 29 Sec

    #shikha #BMLT 7th semester #Enrollment No- jv-ul/19/3133 #Jayoti vidyapeeth Women university #Jv mission Blood banking is the process that takes place in the lab to make sure that donated blood, or blood products, are safe before they are used in blood transfusions and other medical procedures. Blood banking includes typing the blood for transfusion and testing for infectious diseases.Most blood donors are volunteers. However, sometimes, a patient may want to donate blood a couple of weeks before undergoing surgery, so that his or her blood is available in case of a blood transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Most blood donors are volunteers. But you may also donate blood several weeks before having surgery. This is so that your blood is available in case you need a transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation.Good health of the donor must be fully ensured. The universally accepted criteria for donor selection are: Age between 18 and 60 years Haemoglobin - not less than 12.5 g/Dl Pulse - between 50 and 100/minute with no irregularities Blood Pressure -Systolic 100-180 mm Hg and Diastolic 50 - 100 mm Hg Temperature - Normal (oral temperature not exceeding 37.50C) Who should not donate People who might not be able to donate blood include those who:- have used needles to take drugs, steroids, or other substances that a doctor has not prescribed have engaged in sex for money or drugs test positive for certain conditions, such as HIV. have taken certain medications are male and have had sexual contact with other males in the past 3 months Red blood cells or packed cells is transfused to patients with anemia/iron deficiency. It also helps to improve the oxygen saturation in blood. It can be stored at 1.0 °C-6.0 °C for 35–45 days. Platelet transfusion is transfused to those who suffer from low platelet count. Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5–7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it is bit expensive than regular. Plasma transfusion is indicated to patients with liver failure, severe infections or serious burns. Fresh frozen plasma can be stored at a very low temperature of -25 °C for up to 12 months. The separation of plasma from a donors blood is called plasmapheresis.

  • AANCHAL JAIN 321 Hrs 17 Min 03 Sec

    #AANCHALJAIN #BSC MLT 7TH SMESTER #ENROLLMENT NO. JV-U/18/2210 # JAYOTI VIDYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY# JV MISSIONWorld Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is held on June 14 each year. The event was organised for the first time in 2005, by a joint initiative of the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products, and to thank blood donors for their voluntary, life-saving gifts of blood. World Blood Donor Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Chagas Disease Day, World Tuberculosis Day, World Immunization Week, World Patient Safety Day, World Malaria Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day.Transfusion of blood and blood products helps and save millions of lives every year. It can help patients who suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It also has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. Access to safe and sufficient blood and blood products can help reduce rates of death and disability due to severe bleeding during delivery and after childbirth. In many countries, there is not an adequate supply of safe blood, and blood services face the challenge of making sufficient blood available, while also ensuring its quality and safety. An adequate supply can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary unpaid blood donors. The WHOs goal is for all countries to obtain all their blood supplies from voluntary unpaid donors by 2020. In 2014, 60 countries have their national blood supplies based on 99-100% voluntary unpaid blood donations, with 73 countries still largely dependent on family and paid donors.It emphasizes thanking of blood donors who save lives every day through their blood donations and inspires more people all over the world to donate blood voluntarily and regularly with the slogan “Give freely, give often". Blood donation matters. This year campaign pays attention to stories from people whose lives have been saved through blood donation. Activities include memorable events, meetings, publication of relevant stories on media, scientific conferences, publication of articles on national, regional and international scientific journals, and other activities that would help in encouraging the title of this years World Blood Donor Day.The host country for World Blood Donor Day 2015 is China through its blood center in Shanghai,Shanghai Blood Centre, also the WHO Collaborating Center for Blood Transfusion Services. THANK YOU.

  • SHRUTI SONI 321 Hrs 17 Min 46 Sec

    #SHRUTI SONI #BSC. MLT # ENROLL.NO=Jv-u/18/2239 #JYOTI VIDHYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY #TOPIC;-Digital blood bank There are still a lot of Blood Banks worldwide that although they employ locally some Laboratory application software, however, their activities are still based on manually filled up pre-printed template paper forms. A typical Hospital Blood Bank administration schema comprises of the manual documentation and management of various routine functions. We have investigated [1] the employed paper-forms in major Hospitals, as well as, their specifications in national and transnational legal documents, and we have developed a MS Access based related Databases system that allows for, first, the reproduction of the familiar to the personnel lay-out of the employed paper-forms, second, the digital archiving of all transactions, third, the transmission of demands and responses through electronic mail, and finally the full searchability of the system. A secure password protected Internet-accessible Dynamic Medical and Administrative Text and Image Library that supports remote Regional Routine Administration, as well as, Crisis and Disaster management, completes the system. Upon this Dynamic Library an educational module, comprising of means such as on-line lecture-slides, lecture notes, digital video material, self-evaluation quizzes, and other important information, developed or made available, to cover important subjects of Transfusion Medicine.

  • PUJA DEVI 321 Hrs 17 Min 58 Sec

    #PUJA#BMLT 7 SEMESTER#JV-U/18/2222# DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOTHERAPY AND DIAGNOSTICS #........A blood bank is a place where blood is collected and stored before it is used for transfusions. Blood banking takes place in the lab. This is to make sure that donated blood and blood products are safe before they are used. Blood banking also determines the blood type. The blood is also tested for infectious diseases. Healthcare provider caring for man donating blood. Facts about blood banking According to the American Red Cross: About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day. The number of blood units donated is about 13.6 million a year. About 6.8 million volunteers are blood donors each year. Each unit of blood is broken down into components. These are red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitated AHF (cryo), a white blood cell called a granulocyte, and platelets. One unit of whole blood and its parts may be transfused to several people. Each person may have a different need. More than 21 million blood components are transfused each year. Who are the blood donors? Most blood donors are volunteers. But you may also donate blood several weeks before having surgery. This is so that your blood is available in case you need a transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Volunteer blood donors must meet certain criteria. These include: Must be at least 16 years of age, or the minimum age set by state law Must be in good health Must weigh at least 110 pounds Must pass the physical and health history exam given before donation Some states let people younger than 16 or 17 years to donate blood, with parental consent. What tests are done in blood banking? Certain standard tests are done in the lab once blood is donated. These include: Typing. This is blood type. Blood can be A, B, AB, or O. Rh typing. This can be Rh positive or Rh negative. Screening for any unexpected red blood cell antibodies. These antibodies may cause problems in the person getting the blood Screening for current or past infections. The list includes: Hepatitis viruses B and C HIV Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) I and II Syphilis West Nile virus Chagas disease Blood cells are treated with radiation. This kills any T-lymphocytes in the donated blood. T-lymphocytes can cause a reaction when transfused. They can also cause graft-versus-host problems. This is a rare complication of a blood transfusion. Blood may also be filtered to remove certain white blood cells called leukocytes (leukocyte-reduced blood). These cells contain antibodies that can cause fevers in the person getting the transfusion. After getting several transfusions, the person may be at higher risk for a reaction. What are the blood types? According to the AABB, blood types make up the following portions of the U.S. population: O Rh-positive - 39% A Rh-positive - 30% B Rh-positive - 9% O Rh-negative - 9% A Rh-negative - 6% AB Rh-positive - 4% B Rh-negative - 2% AB Rh-negative - 1% What are the components of blood? Blood or one of its components may be transfused. Each component serves many functions. Red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to the tissues in the body. They are commonly used to treat anemia. Platelets. They help the blood clot. They are used to treat leukemia and other forms of cancer. White blood cells. This is a type of white blood cell that helps fight infection. It helps in the immune process. Plasma. This is the watery, liquid part of the blood. Red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are a part of this liquid. Plasma is needed to carry the many parts of the blood through the bloodstream. Plasma serves many function. It is generally transfused to replace blood-clotting proteins. Cryoprecipitate AHF. The party of the plasma that contains clotting factors that help control bleeding. Albumin, immune globulins, and clotting-factors may also be separated and processed for transfusions.A blood bank collects, separates, tests and stores blood until a patient needs it. If you’ve donated blood before, you’ve been part of the blood banking process. The first blood bank in the United States was established in 1937 by Dr. Bernard Fantus at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. At the time, it was not possible to store blood for more than a few days. Most transfusions were person-to-person, a dangerous process which made it hard to find donors. Hoping to solve this problem, Dr. Fantus began experimenting with ways to safely store blood. Initially called the Blood Preservation Laboratory, he changed the name to “blood bank” which was less likely to scare away potential donors. The ability to collect and store blood for an extended period of time revolutionized how doctors treated patients. Donating blood was no longer a high-risk process and patients in need had access to blood they needed for survival.The first step in the blood banking process is collection. Most blood banks, including the American Red Cross, rely on volunteer blood donors. During a typical blood donation, about 1 pint of blood is collected, along with a few small tubes for testing. The tubes and donation are labeled with donor information and sent off for processing and testing. Next, the donated blood is taken to the processing center. Whole blood is usually centrifuged, which separates it into its many components that patients may need: red blood cells, platelets and plasma. White blood cells are removed from the blood to minimize the chance of a reaction in the recipient.While the donation is being processed, the blood test tubes are sent out for screening. At the American Red Cross, this includes testing for diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and West Nile Virus. If any of the tests are positive, the donor will be notified and the blood will not be used. During the testing stage, the blood is also typed for ABO groups and Rh factor. Once the blood is screened and processed, it is stored up to 42 days or until it is needed. A blood bank ensures that hospitals have a safe, reliable blood supply for patients in need. You can help meet supply demands by scheduling your donation today. Your donation may even help save more than one life.

  • ANCHAL RAHA 321 Hrs 18 Min 10 Sec

    #ANCHAL RAHA #b.sc.mlt 7th sem #scholler no. 2019078 #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #TOWARDS “DIGITAL BLOOD-BANKING” Blood and Blood components are essential for health-care service delivery. Blood components are often used in life threatening situations of severely ill patients and, therefore high standards of quality and safety of Blood components have to be assured. These high standards can only be achieved by applying the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice during the collection, preparation, storage, dispatch, quality control and quality assurance of these products. Important instruments for the safety improvement of the Blood and Blood products supply constitute, first, clinical Guidelines that lead the Transfusion practice, second, an inspection system to control the compliance to the guidelines, and finally, a hemovigilance program that supervises the Blood supply chain, and offers counter actions to eventual threats for the safety of Blood product recipients. Obviously, for the achievement of these goals the employment of Clinical and Laboratory Information Systems based on mutually and reliably communicating computer networks is indispensable.A blood bank is a place where blood is collected and stored before it is used for transfusions. Blood banking takes place in the lab. This is to make sure that donated blood and blood products are safe before they are used. Blood banking also determines the blood type. The blood is also tested for infectious diseases. Healthcare provider caring for man donating blood. Facts about blood banking According to the American Red Cross: About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day.

  • PUJA DEVI 321 Hrs 21 Min 08 Sec

    A blood bank is a place where blood is collected and stored before it is used for transfusions. Blood banking takes place in the lab. This is to make sure that donated blood and blood products are safe before they are used. Blood banking also determines the blood type. The blood is also tested for infectious diseases. Healthcare provider caring for man donating blood. Facts about blood banking According to the American Red Cross: About 36,000 units of blood are needed every day. The number of blood units donated is about 13.6 million a year. About 6.8 million volunteers are blood donors each year. Each unit of blood is broken down into components. These are red blood cells, plasma, cryoprecipitated AHF (cryo), a white blood cell called a granulocyte, and platelets. One unit of whole blood and its parts may be transfused to several people. Each person may have a different need. More than 21 million blood components are transfused each year. Who are the blood donors? Most blood donors are volunteers. But you may also donate blood several weeks before having surgery. This is so that your blood is available in case you need a transfusion. Donating blood for yourself is called an autologous donation. Volunteer blood donors must meet certain criteria. These include: Must be at least 16 years of age, or the minimum age set by state law Must be in good health Must weigh at least 110 pounds Must pass the physical and health history exam given before donation Some states let people younger than 16 or 17 years to donate blood, with parental consent. What tests are done in blood banking? Certain standard tests are done in the lab once blood is donated. These include: Typing. This is blood type. Blood can be A, B, AB, or O. Rh typing. This can be Rh positive or Rh negative. Screening for any unexpected red blood cell antibodies. These antibodies may cause problems in the person getting the blood Screening for current or past infections. The list includes: Hepatitis viruses B and C HIV Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) I and II Syphilis West Nile virus Chagas disease Blood cells are treated with radiation. This kills any T-lymphocytes in the donated blood. T-lymphocytes can cause a reaction when transfused. They can also cause graft-versus-host problems. This is a rare complication of a blood transfusion. Blood may also be filtered to remove certain white blood cells called leukocytes (leukocyte-reduced blood). These cells contain antibodies that can cause fevers in the person getting the transfusion. After getting several transfusions, the person may be at higher risk for a reaction. What are the blood types? According to the AABB, blood types make up the following portions of the U.S. population: O Rh-positive - 39% A Rh-positive - 30% B Rh-positive - 9% O Rh-negative - 9% A Rh-negative - 6% AB Rh-positive - 4% B Rh-negative - 2% AB Rh-negative - 1% What are the components of blood? Blood or one of its components may be transfused. Each component serves many functions. Red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to the tissues in the body. They are commonly used to treat anemia. Platelets. They help the blood clot. They are used to treat leukemia and other forms of cancer. White blood cells. This is a type of white blood cell that helps fight infection. It helps in the immune process. Plasma. This is the watery, liquid part of the blood. Red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are a part of this liquid. Plasma is needed to carry the many parts of the blood through the bloodstream. Plasma serves many function. It is generally transfused to replace blood-clotting proteins. Cryoprecipitate AHF. The party of the plasma that contains clotting factors that help control bleeding. Albumin, immune globulins, and clotting-factors may also be separated and processed for transfusions.A blood bank collects, separates, tests and stores blood until a patient needs it. If you’ve donated blood before, you’ve been part of the blood banking process. The first blood bank in the United States was established in 1937 by Dr. Bernard Fantus at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. At the time, it was not possible to store blood for more than a few days. Most transfusions were person-to-person, a dangerous process which made it hard to find donors. Hoping to solve this problem, Dr. Fantus began experimenting with ways to safely store blood. Initially called the Blood Preservation Laboratory, he changed the name to “blood bank” which was less likely to scare away potential donors. The ability to collect and store blood for an extended period of time revolutionized how doctors treated patients. Donating blood was no longer a high-risk process and patients in need had access to blood they needed for survival.The first step in the blood banking process is collection. Most blood banks, including the American Red Cross, rely on volunteer blood donors. During a typical blood donation, about 1 pint of blood is collected, along with a few small tubes for testing. The tubes and donation are labeled with donor information and sent off for processing and testing. Next, the donated blood is taken to the processing center. Whole blood is usually centrifuged, which separates it into its many components that patients may need: red blood cells, platelets and plasma. White blood cells are removed from the blood to minimize the chance of a reaction in the recipient.While the donation is being processed, the blood test tubes are sent out for screening. At the American Red Cross, this includes testing for diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and West Nile Virus. If any of the tests are positive, the donor will be notified and the blood will not be used. During the testing stage, the blood is also typed for ABO groups and Rh factor. Once the blood is screened and processed, it is stored up to 42 days or until it is needed. A blood bank ensures that hospitals have a safe, reliable blood supply for patients in need. You can help meet supply demands by scheduling your donation today. Your donation may even help save more than one life.

  • MANSI SAXENA 321 Hrs 21 Min 19 Sec

    #mansisaxena #b.sc.mlt 7th sem #scholler no. 2019078 #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #TOWARDS “DIGITAL BLOOD-BANKING” Blood and Blood components are essential for health-care service delivery. Blood components are often used in life threatening situations of severely ill patients and, therefore high standards of quality and safety of Blood components have to be assured. These high standards can only be achieved by applying the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice during the collection, preparation, storage, dispatch, quality control and quality assurance of these products. Important instruments for the safety improvement of the Blood and Blood products supply constitute, first, clinical Guidelines that lead the Transfusion practice, second, an inspection system to control the compliance to the guidelines, and finally, a hemovigilance program that supervises the Blood supply chain, and offers counter actions to eventual threats for the safety of Blood product recipients. Obviously, for the achievement of these goals the employment of Clinical and Laboratory Information Systems based on mutually and reliably communicating computer networks is indispensable.

  • RUPALI MAKWANA 321 Hrs 21 Min 40 Sec

    #rupali makwana #BMLT3 semester # enrollment no- jv-u/20/4299# jayoti vidhyapeethwomens univercity # topic- digital blood bank #Blood Bank Management System is a web based system that can assists the information of blood bag during its handling in the blood bank. With this system, the user of this system can key in the result of blood test that has been conducted to each of the blood bag received by the blood bank..Blood Bank Management System is designed to store, process, retrieve and analyze information concerned with the administrative and inventory management within a blood bank .the requirement of blood bank Blood donor details. *Donor details.*Recipient details.*Blood collection details.*Blood issued details.*Stock details.*Camp details.*Reports. The blood is stored in refrigerators at 2 to 6 degrees C. Each unit of whole blood normally is separated into several components. Red blood cells may be stored under refrigeration for a maximum of 42 days, or they may be frozen for up to 10 years. Red cells carry oxygen and are used to treat anaemia.Red cells & whole blood must always be stored at a temperature between +2 degree C to +6 degree C in a blood bank refrigerator. *Blood is a specialized body fluid. It has four main components: plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.: * We can store blood for 42 days if we do not freeze it. Frozen blood can be stored ten years, but freezing blood is a poor way of storing it. Generally speaking, we store blood in the refrigerator, where we can store it for up to 42 days. Blood transfusion services face a dual challenge of ensuring both a sufficient supply and the quality and safety of blood and blood products for patients whose lives or wellbeing depend on blood transfusion. Blood supplies need to be constantly replenished since whole blood and blood components have a limited shelf-life. Most countries battle to meet current requirements while at the same time responding to increasing clinical demands for blood. Developed countries with well-structured health systems and blood transfusion services based on voluntary blood donation are generally able to meet the demand for blood and blood products. They must constantly strive to maintain adequate blood stocks in the face of rising clinical demands, increasingly stringent donor selection criteria and the loss of older donors who are no longer eligible to give blood. Nevertheless, even though there may be periodic or seasonal shortages, access to safe blood for all patients requiring transfusion can generally be taken for granted. Overall, developed countries are likely to have effective blood donor programmes, more voluntary donors, higher donation rates and more available blood.

  • Kiran meena 321 Hrs 24 Min 11 Sec

    #KIRAN MEENA # BSC. MLT 3RD SEMESTER #ENROLLMENT NO.202646# JAYOTI VIDHYAPEETH WOMENS UNIVERSITY#JV MISSIONWorld Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is held on June 14 each year. The event was organised for the first time in 2005, by a joint initiative of the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products, and to thank blood donors for their voluntary, life-saving gifts of blood. World Blood Donor Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Chagas Disease Day, World Tuberculosis Day, World Immunization Week, World Patient Safety Day, World Malaria Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day.Transfusion of blood and blood products helps and save millions of lives every year. It can help patients who suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It also has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and perinatal care. Access to safe and sufficient blood and blood products can help reduce rates of death and disability due to severe bleeding during delivery and after childbirth. In many countries, there is not an adequate supply of safe blood, and blood services face the challenge of making sufficient blood available, while also ensuring its quality and safety. An adequate supply can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary unpaid blood donors. The WHOs goal is for all countries to obtain all their blood supplies from voluntary unpaid donors by 2020. In 2014, 60 countries have their national blood supplies based on 99-100% voluntary unpaid blood donations, with 73 countries still largely dependent on family and paid donors.It emphasizes thanking of blood donors who save lives every day through their blood donations and inspires more people all over the world to donate blood voluntarily and regularly with the slogan “Give freely, give often". Blood donation matters. This year campaign pays attention to stories from people whose lives have been saved through blood donation. Activities include memorable events, meetings, publication of relevant stories on media, scientific conferences, publication of articles on national, regional and international scientific journals, and other activities that would help in encouraging the title of this years World Blood Donor Day.The host country for World Blood Donor Day 2015 is China through its blood center in Shanghai,Shanghai Blood Centre, also the WHO Collaborating Center for Blood Transfusion Services. THANK YOU.

  • CHAUDHARY MAMTA TEJABHAI 321 Hrs 25 Min 10 Sec

    #Mamta Chaudhary #Bmlt 3 Semester #Enrollment No- Jv-u/20/4132 #Jayoti Vidyapeeth Women University #Jv Mission A blood bank is a center where blood gathered as a result of blood donation is stored and preserved for later use in blood transfusion. The term "blood bank" typically refers to a division of a hospital where the storage of blood product occurs and where proper testing is performed (to reduce the risk of transfusion related adverse events). However, it sometimes refers to a collection center, and some hospitals also perform collection. Blood banking includes tasks related to blood collection, processing, testing, separation, and storage. #History:-While the first blood transfusions were made directly from donor to receiver before coagulation, it was discovered that by adding anticoagulant and refrigerating the blood it was possible to store it for some days, thus opening the way for the development of blood banks. John Braxton Hicks was the first to experiment with chemical methods to prevent the coagulation of blood at St Marys Hospital, London, in the late 19th century. His attempts, using phosphate of soda, however, were unsuccessful.The first non-direct transfusion was performed on March 27, 1914, by the Belgian doctor Albert Hustin, though this was a diluted solution of blood. The Argentine doctor Luis Agote used a much less diluted solution in November of the same year. Both used sodium citrate as an anticoagulant. #Types of blood transfused :-Whole blood, which is blood transfused without separation. Red blood cells or packed cells is transfused to patients with anemia/iron deficiency. It also helps to improve the oxygen saturation in blood. It can be stored at 1.0 °C-6.0 °C for 35–45 days. Platelet transfusion is transfused to those who suffer from low platelet count. Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5–7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it is bit expensive than regular. Plasma transfusion is indicated to patients with liver failure, severe infections or serious burns. Fresh frozen plasma can be stored at a very low temperature of -25 °C for up to 12 months. The separation of plasma from a donors blood is called plasmapheresis.

  • CHHABI JADON 321 Hrs 28 Min 47 Sec

    # chhabi jadon # b.sc mlt 3 semester# scholar no. 202215 # jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university # jv missionDonating blood has benefits for your emotional and physical health. According to a report by the Mental Health Foundation, helping others can: reduce stress improve your emotional well-being benefit your physical health help get rid of negative feelings provide a sense of belonging and reduce isolation Research has found further evidence of the health benefits that come specifically from donating blood. thankyou

  • TINA SHARMA 321 Hrs 34 Min 01 Sec

    #tina sharma # b.sc mlt 3 semester # scholler no.202068# jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #Today in the developed world, most blood donors are unpaid volunteers who donate blood for a community supply. In some countries, established supplies are limited and donors usually give blood when family or friends need a transfusion (directed donation). Many donors donate for several reasons, such as a form of charity, general awareness regarding the demand for blood, increased confidence in oneself, helping a personal friend or relative, and social pressure. Despite the many reasons that people donate, not enough potential donors actively donate. However, this is reversed during disasters when blood donations increase, often creating an excess supply that will have to be later discarded. In countries that allow paid donation some people are paid, and in some cases there are incentives other than money such as paid time off from work. People can also have blood drawn for their own future use (autologous donation). Donating is relatively safe, but some donors have bruising where the needle is inserted or may feel faint. Potential donors are evaluated for anything that might make their blood unsafe to use. The screening includes testing for diseases that can be transmitted by a blood transfusion, including HIV and viral hepatitis. The donor must also answer questions about medical history and take a short physical examination to make sure the donation is not hazardous to his or her health. How often a donor can donate varies from days to months based on what component they donate and the laws of the country where the donation takes place. For example, in the United States, donors must wait 56 days.

  • ANCHAL RAHA 9850 Hrs 15 Min 27 Sec

    #anchal raha #bmlt 5 semester #enrollment no- jv-ul/19/3134#jayoti vidyapeethwomens university #jvmission my grand parents keeps telling me about rajasthani poshak[dress],so today I am writing about the same.so lets start.... Traditional attire for Rajasthani women is ghagra, choli and odhni. The ghagra is a full-length, embroidered and pleated skirt, which comes in a variety of colours, prints and fabrics, such as silk, cotton, georgette and crêpe. Of all the various prints, the laharia, bandhej, tie, chundri and mothra are the most widely worn. The odhni, or chunar, is a long piece of cloth, approximately 2.5 meters in length and 1.5 meters in width, and is worn as a veil. Made of light printed or patched fabric, it features beautiful embroidery, beadwork or other embellishments. There are different ways of wearing it, but the most traditional way is tucking one corner inside the ghagra, resting the middle portion on the chest and draping the end part over each shoulder and above the head, covering it gracefully. Elaborate necklaces, like Jadau sets, aad and Raani Har are worn around the neck, especially by women from affluent families. The women of tribal groups such as Bhil, Meena or Garasia prefer wearing brass, silver or white metal ornaments. Kaanbali or surliya (earrings), nathani (nosepins), bajubandh (armlets), rakhdi or borla (maang tikkas), tagdi or kardhani (belly or waist chains), payal (anklets), bangadi (bangles), bichuwa (toe rings) and finger rings are also worn to complete the ensemble. The traditional outfit for Rajasthani men is dhoti and angarkha, or pyjama-kurta. The dhoti is a long piece of cloth tied around the waist and wrapped around like a loin-cloth between the legs. The angarkha is usually worn by the wealthy class. The pyjama is like track pants, and generally made from cotton. It is paired with kurta or mufti, which is a loose-fitting shirt. While it usually goes down to the knees, today Rajasthani men may take liberties with the length and pattern of this traditional costume.The traditional outfit is incomplete without pagari (turban), which is generally two meters long and 0.2 meters wide. It comes in a variety of colours, shapes and sizes, and is considered the pride and honour of men. There are different ways of wearing it, each defining a specific region or caste. Specially designed pagaris, called safas are worn during weddings and festivals, while everyday pagaris are rustic. Both men and women in Rajasthan wear jootis or mojaris. They are leather shoes made up of sheep, camel or goat skin, complete with intricate embroidery and embellishments. While traditional footwear is usually black or brown, nowadays much more fashionable multi-coloured slip-ons are also available. Thank you