Jv Mission CDA

B. Pharm. & M.Pharm.

Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron (B. Pharm. & M.Pharm.)

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  • DEVANSHI JADAUN 3292 Hrs 01 Min 44 Sec

    #Devanshi Jadaun #jv-u/18/2055#b.pharma7 th sem #jayoti vidyapeet women"s university jaipur#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicronAs the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • NEHA TANWAR 3292 Hrs 05 Min 01 Sec

    #Neha Tanwar #jv-u/18/2710 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicron As pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • ANISHA SINGH 3309 Hrs 39 Min 36 Sec

    #Anisha Singh#jv-u/18/2201 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • VEDIKA CHOUDHARY 3312 Hrs 56 Min 29 Sec

    #Preeti gurjar #BPharma1stSem #JV-U/21/5082 #JVWU Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • PRIYANKA MEGHWAL 3312 Hrs 58 Min 57 Sec

    #priyanka meghwal #BPharma1stSem #JV-U/21/5034 #JVWU Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • VEDIKA CHOUDHARY 3313 Hrs 04 Min 49 Sec

    #preeti gurjar #BPharma1stSem #JV-U/21/5082 #JVWU Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • B. DEEPTI 3313 Hrs 05 Min 10 Sec

    #kajal gupta #jv-u/18/2244 #b.pharm 7th sem # #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jvmission # community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • TANISHA KUMAWAT 3313 Hrs 07 Min 46 Sec

    # tanishka #BPharma1stSem #JV-U/21/5052 #JVWU Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • KALPANA YADAV 3313 Hrs 23 Min 25 Sec

    #Kalpana yadav#jv-u/21/5428#b.pharma 1st sem#jyoti vidyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. Implementing the CPCS Practices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team

  • RADHA RANI 3313 Hrs 36 Min 19 Sec

    #Radha rani #202147 #b.pharm 3th sem # #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jvmission # community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • RADHA RANI 3313 Hrs 36 Min 56 Sec

    #Radha rani #202147 #b.pharm 3th sem# #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jvmission# community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • SHIVANI KRITI 3313 Hrs 43 Min 32 Sec

    # SHIVANI KRITI #JV -U/19/3058 # B. PHARAM 3RD YEAR#JVWU#BPHARM #Community Pharmacy AND Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron On 26 November 2021, WHO designated the variant B.1.1.529 a variant of concern, named Omicron, on the advice of WHO’s Technical Advisory Group on Virus Evolution TAG-VE. This decision was based on the evidence presented to the TAG-VE that Omicron has several mutations that may have an impact on how it behaves, for example, on how easily it spreads or the severity of illness it causes. The public health role of the pharmacist is yet to be clearly defined, broadly recognized and sufficiently promoted by public health agencies, pharmacy educators or other health care professionals.6 Pharmacists offer an accessibility that is rare among health care professionals. The pharmacist has health knowledge on which to build and is often uniquely sited in the community to provide public health services, in some cases 24 hours per day. No appointment is needed at most community pharmacies. Pharmacists work in a variety of public settings, including hospitals, drug, grocery and retail stores, and nursing homes. This convenience creates a large window of opportunity in which to provide public health services, therefore filling a void related to access to care and prevention. Further, pharmacists in the community are in an ideal position to act as information resources on lifestyle changes that can influence healthy outcomes.7,8 Pharmacists are involved in health screenings iabetes, cholesterol, osteoporosis9-11 immunizations,12 pain control,13 participatory and clinical research, and counseling/ health education.14 They also provide information on self-management hypertension, asthma, HIV, smoking cessation,15,16 alcohol, tobacco and other drug use prevention, family planning,17 medication indications and conditions. Public health nurses, physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, dentists, nutritionists and other health workers need varying degrees of knowledge related to drug therapy. Pharmacists of today are actively teaching physician assistants, nurses, and physicians various techniques of prescribing medications and issues related to the drug use process.14,18 Information about drugs is taught through mechanisms such as in-service training, newsletters, seminars, courses in nursing and medical schools, and continuing education. These illustrate ways pharmacists can add to the refinement of knowledge within the public health system.19,20 Schools of public health have the opportunity to expose their students to the contribution pharmacists make to public health and the training of public health workers. There is a growing need for dually trained professionals in pharmacy and public health. A small number of colleges of pharmacy offer dual degree programs with PharmD/MPH options,21,22 but overall, pharmacy students are only exposed to public health concepts on a fleeting basis. Few courses are devoted solely to public health in pharmacy, and virtually no textbooks exist to emphasize the role of pharmacy in public health. Consequently, there exists a need for pharmacy schools to incorporate public health and pharmacoepidemiology courses into their curriculum and train pharmacists as public health professionals.23,24 In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) recognized the important role pharmacists can play in public health by including population-based care in its Center for Excellence in Pharmacy Education (CAPE) Educational Outcomes.25 The outcomes emphasized the pharmacists role in "health improvement, wellness, and disease prevention." It also highlighted the need for pharmacist involvement in ensuring access to quality care and advancing public health policy. findings showed the different roles of pharmacists during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as disease prevention and infection control, adequate storage and drug supply, patient care and support for healthcare professionals. #STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY

  • Kushi Pahuja 3313 Hrs 45 Min 27 Sec

    #khushipahuja #jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity #bachelorofpharmacy3rdsemster #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicron.community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.Its important to maintain a #healthy diet and stay physically active, especially during this time #Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated or boosted ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, dont travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, dont go indoors with people youre not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, #thankyou

  • POOJA 3313 Hrs 50 Min 45 Sec

    # SHIVANI KRITI #JV -U/19/3058 # B. PHARAM 3RD YEAR#JVWU#BPHARM #Community Pharmacy AND Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron On 26 November 2021, WHO designated the variant B.1.1.529 a variant of concern, named Omicron, on the advice of WHO’s Technical Advisory Group on Virus Evolution TAG-VE. This decision was based on the evidence presented to the TAG-VE that Omicron has several mutations that may have an impact on how it behaves, for example, on how easily it spreads or the severity of illness it causes. The public health role of the pharmacist is yet to be clearly defined, broadly recognized and sufficiently promoted by public health agencies, pharmacy educators or other health care professionals.6 Pharmacists offer an accessibility that is rare among health care professionals. The pharmacist has health knowledge on which to build and is often uniquely sited in the community to provide public health services, in some cases 24 hours per day. No appointment is needed at most community pharmacies. Pharmacists work in a variety of public settings, including hospitals, drug, grocery and retail stores, and nursing homes. This convenience creates a large window of opportunity in which to provide public health services, therefore filling a void related to access to care and prevention. Further, pharmacists in the community are in an ideal position to act as information resources on lifestyle changes that can influence healthy outcomes.7,8 Pharmacists are involved in health screenings iabetes, cholesterol, osteoporosis9-11 immunizations,12 pain control,13 participatory and clinical research, and counseling/ health education.14 They also provide information on self-management hypertension, asthma, HIV, smoking cessation,15,16 alcohol, tobacco and other drug use prevention, family planning,17 medication indications and conditions. Public health nurses, physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, dentists, nutritionists and other health workers need varying degrees of knowledge related to drug therapy. Pharmacists of today are actively teaching physician assistants, nurses, and physicians various techniques of prescribing medications and issues related to the drug use process.14,18 Information about drugs is taught through mechanisms such as in-service training, newsletters, seminars, courses in nursing and medical schools, and continuing education. These illustrate ways pharmacists can add to the refinement of knowledge within the public health system.19,20 Schools of public health have the opportunity to expose their students to the contribution pharmacists make to public health and the training of public health workers. There is a growing need for dually trained professionals in pharmacy and public health. A small number of colleges of pharmacy offer dual degree programs with PharmD/MPH options,21,22 but overall, pharmacy students are only exposed to public health concepts on a fleeting basis. Few courses are devoted solely to public health in pharmacy, and virtually no textbooks exist to emphasize the role of pharmacy in public health. Consequently, there exists a need for pharmacy schools to incorporate public health and pharmacoepidemiology courses into their curriculum and train pharmacists as public health professionals.23,24 In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) recognized the important role pharmacists can play in public health by including population-based care in its Center for Excellence in Pharmacy Education (CAPE) Educational Outcomes.25 The outcomes emphasized the pharmacists role in "health improvement, wellness, and disease prevention." It also highlighted the need for pharmacist involvement in ensuring access to quality care and advancing public health policy. findings showed the different roles of pharmacists during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as disease prevention and infection control, adequate storage and drug supply, patient care and support for healthcare professionals. #STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY

  • DEEPIKA RATHI 3313 Hrs 53 Min 02 Sec

    # DEEPIKA RATHI#JV-U/19/3083#JVWU#BPHARM #Community Pharmacy AND Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron On 26 November 2021, WHO designated the variant B.1.1.529 a variant of concern, named Omicron, on the advice of WHO’s Technical Advisory Group on Virus Evolution TAG-VE. This decision was based on the evidence presented to the TAG-VE that Omicron has several mutations that may have an impact on how it behaves, for example, on how easily it spreads or the severity of illness it causes. The public health role of the pharmacist is yet to be clearly defined, broadly recognized and sufficiently promoted by public health agencies, pharmacy educators or other health care professionals.6 Pharmacists offer an accessibility that is rare among health care professionals. The pharmacist has health knowledge on which to build and is often uniquely sited in the community to provide public health services, in some cases 24 hours per day. No appointment is needed at most community pharmacies. Pharmacists work in a variety of public settings, including hospitals, drug, grocery and retail stores, and nursing homes. This convenience creates a large window of opportunity in which to provide public health services, therefore filling a void related to access to care and prevention. Further, pharmacists in the community are in an ideal position to act as information resources on lifestyle changes that can influence healthy outcomes.7,8 Pharmacists are involved in health screenings iabetes, cholesterol, osteoporosis9-11 immunizations,12 pain control,13 participatory and clinical research, and counseling/ health education.14 They also provide information on self-management hypertension, asthma, HIV, smoking cessation,15,16 alcohol, tobacco and other drug use prevention, family planning,17 medication indications and conditions. Public health nurses, physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, dentists, nutritionists and other health workers need varying degrees of knowledge related to drug therapy. Pharmacists of today are actively teaching physician assistants, nurses, and physicians various techniques of prescribing medications and issues related to the drug use process.14,18 Information about drugs is taught through mechanisms such as in-service training, newsletters, seminars, courses in nursing and medical schools, and continuing education. These illustrate ways pharmacists can add to the refinement of knowledge within the public health system.19,20 Schools of public health have the opportunity to expose their students to the contribution pharmacists make to public health and the training of public health workers. There is a growing need for dually trained professionals in pharmacy and public health. A small number of colleges of pharmacy offer dual degree programs with PharmD/MPH options,21,22 but overall, pharmacy students are only exposed to public health concepts on a fleeting basis. Few courses are devoted solely to public health in pharmacy, and virtually no textbooks exist to emphasize the role of pharmacy in public health. Consequently, there exists a need for pharmacy schools to incorporate public health and pharmacoepidemiology courses into their curriculum and train pharmacists as public health professionals.23,24 In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) recognized the important role pharmacists can play in public health by including population-based care in its Center for Excellence in Pharmacy Education (CAPE) Educational Outcomes.25 The outcomes emphasized the pharmacists role in "health improvement, wellness, and disease prevention." It also highlighted the need for pharmacist involvement in ensuring access to quality care and advancing public health policy. findings showed the different roles of pharmacists during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as disease prevention and infection control, adequate storage and drug supply, patient care and support for healthcare professionals. #STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY

  • ANJALI 3313 Hrs 55 Min 44 Sec

    #khushipahuja #jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity #bachelorofpharmacy3rdsemster #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicron.community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.Its important to maintain a #healthy diet and stay physically active, especially during this time #Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated or boosted ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, dont travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, dont go indoors with people youre not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, #thankyou

  • BHUMIKA SHARMA 3313 Hrs 59 Min 17 Sec

    #BhumikaSharma #jv-u/18/2197 #b.pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jvmission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • BHUMIKA SHARMA 3313 Hrs 59 Min 32 Sec

    #BhumikaSharma #jv-u/18/2197 #b.pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jvmission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • ANJU MEENA 3314 Hrs 01 Min 16 Sec

    #AnjuMeena #BPharma1stSem #21359 #JV-U/21/5328 #JVWU Community Pharmacy & Primary Health Care To Prevent Omicron As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support.

  • B. DEEPTI 3314 Hrs 01 Min 21 Sec

    #Deepti behara #jv-u/18/2221 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • B. DEEPTI 3314 Hrs 01 Min 37 Sec

    #Deepti behara #jv-u/18/2221 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • B. DEEPTI 3314 Hrs 01 Min 58 Sec

    #Deepti behara #jv-u/18/2221 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • ANJALI 3314 Hrs 03 Min 36 Sec

    #anjalisharma#jv-u/20/4105 #bachelorofpharmacy3rdsemster#jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.Therefore, an antibody cocktail is unlikely to be effective. Mehta has seen an increase in its demand from patients — a trend reported nationally — and hopes that once RT-PCR tests which can indicate omicron’s presence are made available, distinguishing treatment would become easier. Till now, cases have been milder than they were in the second wave. Most patients are referred to home quarantine and over the counter medication. Symptomatic management, the first pillar, remains the medical fraternity’s focus. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy.

  • AKANKSHA TIWARI 3314 Hrs 04 Min 27 Sec

    #Akankshatiwari #jv-u/18/2105 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicron As pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • AKANKSHA TIWARI 3314 Hrs 05 Min 03 Sec

    #Akankshatiwari #jv-u/18/2105 #b pharm 7th sem #jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university #jv mission #community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicron As pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • NANDINI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 06 Min 29 Sec

    #NandiniSharma #Jv-u/19/3037 #Bpharm5thsem #JayotividyapeetwomensUniversity #Jvmission #As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS)GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacie .Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.s. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy .It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred Some parts of the media would have us believe that general practice has been effectively closed for business since the pandemic began. All of us in general practice, explains Sarah Jarvis, know the reality is very different indeed. As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department.In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit. Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate.

  • ANURADHA  KUMAWAT 3314 Hrs 06 Min 52 Sec

    #anuradha kumawat # jv-u/20/4113 #b pharm 3rdsem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • MONIKA 3314 Hrs 08 Min 44 Sec

    # Monika # jv-u/20/4119 #b pharm 3sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 08 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 13 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 16 Sec

    #madhu yadav#202563#b pharm 3 sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 20 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 23 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 26 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 29 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 31 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 34 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 37 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 40 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 43 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KANCHAN RAWAT 3314 Hrs 30 Min 46 Sec

    #riyachauhan#jv-u/21/5009#b pharm 1st sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • BHAVYA KUMARI 3314 Hrs 30 Min 48 Sec

    #anjalisharma#jv-u/20/4105 #bachelorofpharmacy3rdsemster#jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KHUSHI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 31 Min 42 Sec

    #khushi sharma #jv-u/20/4518 #bpharmacy3rdsemester #jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity #jaipur #jvmission #community #pharmacy and primary health care to prevent #omicron #seven countries in #SouthEastAsia Region confirming cases of the new #COVID19 variant Omicron #Countries can and must prevent the spread of Omicron with the proven health and social measures #Protect yourself and protect each other #Get #vaccinated #wearamask #keepdistance open #windows #clean your hands and cough and sneeze safely Continue to take all precautions even after taking #vaccinedoses It is essential to mask yourself properly #take both doses of vaccines maintain #socialdistancing and maintain good #ventilation to the maximum possible # Keep a distance of at least 1 metre from others #The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus and how easily Omicron spreads compared to Delta remains unknown. CDC expects that anyone with Omicron infection can spread the virus to others, even if they are vaccinated or don’t have symptoms #CDC recommends that everyone 5 years and older protect themselves from COVID-19 by getting fully vaccinated #CDC provides advice about masks for people who want to learn more about what type of mask is right for them depending on their circumstances #Two types of tests are used to test for current infection: #nucleicacidamplificationtests (NAATs) and #antigentests. NAAT and antigen tests can only tell you if you have a current #infection #If your self-test has a positive result, stay home or isolate for 10 days, wear a mask if you have contact with others, and call your #healthcare provider # With other variants, like #Delta, #vaccines have remained effective at preventing severe #illness, #hospitalizations, and death. The recent emergence of Omicron further emphasizes the importance of vaccination and #boosters.# Get all of the doses and get boosted as well. In the meantime, social distance wherever possible, frequently sanitize your hands and surfaces you touch (like desks in conference rooms or classrooms), and wear a mask—especially in indoor areas with a lot of people or where there is poor ventilation. I suggest a disposable mask rather than a cloth one if youre able to obtain it.#Its important to maintain a #healthy diet and stay physically active, especially during this time #Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated or boosted ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, dont travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, dont go indoors with people youre not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, #thankyou

  • MAHIMA SHARMA 3314 Hrs 31 Min 42 Sec

    # Mahima Sharma # jv-u/19/3606 # B. pharm 5 sem # ayoti vidhyapeeth womens university # jv mission # community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • KHUSHI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 31 Min 46 Sec

    #madhu yadav #202563# b.pharma 3rd sem #jvwu# Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Most people who fall sick with COVID-19 will experience mild to moderate symptoms and recover without special treatment. However, some will become seriously ill and require medical attention. HOW IT SPREADS The virus can spread from an infected person’s mouth or nose in small liquid particles when they cough, sneeze, speak, sing or breathe. These particles range from larger respiratory droplets to smaller aerosols. You can be infected by breathing in the virus if you are near someone who has COVID-19, or by touching a contaminated surface and then your eyes, nose or mouth. The virus spreads more easily indoors and in crowded settings.

  • NAINA 3314 Hrs 31 Min 49 Sec

    #naina #jv-u/19/3041 #bpharmacy #5thsemester #jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity #jaipur #jvmission #community #pharmacy and primary health care to prevent #omicron #seven countries in #SouthEastAsia Region confirming cases of the new #COVID19 variant Omicron #Countries can and must prevent the spread of Omicron with the proven health and social measures #Protect yourself and protect each other #Get #vaccinated #wearamask #keepdistance open #windows #clean your hands and cough and sneeze safely Continue to take all precautions even after taking #vaccinedoses It is essential to mask yourself properly #take both doses of vaccines maintain #socialdistancing and maintain good #ventilation to the maximum possible # Keep a distance of at least 1 metre from others #The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus and how easily Omicron spreads compared to Delta remains unknown. CDC expects that anyone with Omicron infection can spread the virus to others, even if they are vaccinated or don’t have symptoms #CDC recommends that everyone 5 years and older protect themselves from COVID-19 by getting fully vaccinated #CDC provides advice about masks for people who want to learn more about what type of mask is right for them depending on their circumstances #Two types of tests are used to test for current infection: #nucleicacidamplificationtests (NAATs) and #antigentests. NAAT and antigen tests can only tell you if you have a current #infection #If your self-test has a positive result, stay home or isolate for 10 days, wear a mask if you have contact with others, and call your #healthcare provider # With other variants, like #Delta, #vaccines have remained effective at preventing severe #illness, #hospitalizations, and death. The recent emergence of Omicron further emphasizes the importance of vaccination and #boosters.# Get all of the doses and get boosted as well. In the meantime, social distance wherever possible, frequently sanitize your hands and surfaces you touch (like desks in conference rooms or classrooms), and wear a mask—especially in indoor areas with a lot of people or where there is poor ventilation. I suggest a disposable mask rather than a cloth one if youre able to obtain it.#Its important to maintain a #healthy diet and stay physically active, especially during this time #Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated or boosted ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, dont travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, dont go indoors with people youre not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, #thankyou

  • MAHIMA SINGH 3314 Hrs 31 Min 58 Sec

    #jvwu#bpharma1year#mahimasingh#jv-u/21/5008 Home / India News / Awareness key in fight against Omicron: PM INDIA NEWS Awareness key in fight against Omicron: PM It is the effort of citizens that is crucial to defeat the global pandemic, Modi said in this year’s last Mann Ki Baat programme on Sunday The Prime Minister also spoke about the tragic helicopter crash in which chief of defence staff General Bipin Rawat, his wife and 12 defence personnel lost their lives. The Prime Minister also spoke about the tragic helicopter crash in which chief of defence staff General Bipin Rawat, his wife and 12 defence personnel lost their lives. Updated on Dec 27, 2021 02:21 AM IST By HT Correspondent , Hindustan Times, New Delhi Awareness and discipline have to be the strength of Indians in the fight against the Omicron variant of coronavirus, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in his monthly radio broadcast to the nation. Although scientists are constantly studying the new variant and the government is working on their suggestions, it is the effort of citizens that is crucial to defeat the global pandemic, Modi said in this year’s last Mann Ki Baat programme on Sunday. “We have to remember that a new variant of Corona has already knocked on our doors,” he said. “In such a situation, self-awareness and self-discipline are our strength in the fight against this variant of Corona. Only our collective strength will defeat corona, and it is with this very sense of responsibility we have to enter into 2022.” India will start vaccinating children aged 15 and above from 3 January, and there will an additional jab for fully inoculated frontline health workers and senior citizens from 10 January, the Prime Minister had announced on a televised address on Saturday. The government’s efforts to inoculate the country’s population is praiseworthy, he said. “Crossing the 140 million vaccine dose mark is an achievement of every Indian,” Modi said in the 84th edition of the radio programme. “This shows that every Indian has trust in the system and trust in science and in scientists. It is also a testament to the willpower of the people who are fulfilling their responsibilities towards society.” The Prime Minister also spoke about the tragic helicopter crash in which chief of defence staff General Bipin Rawat, his wife and 12 defence personnel lost their lives. He paid tribute to Shaurya Chakra awardee Group Captain Varun Singh, the lone survivor who succumbed to his injuries a week after the crash, for his humility and effort to inspire students. Referring to Singh’s letter to his school principal after receiving the military decoration for valour, Modi said, “After reading this letter, the first thought that came to my mind was that even after reaching the pinnacle of success, he did not forget to nurture his roots. When he had time to celebrate, he showed concern for the generations to come…he did not boast of his valour, instead he referred to his failures, but talked about howIn the letter, which went viral on social media after Singh’s death, he wrote that “it is okay to be mediocre” and performance in school was by no means the measure of things to come in life. Modi noted that the Swachh Bharat campaign for cleaniness and hygiene was a common theme in all the suggestions and messages he received from people for the new year. He spoke about the individual initiatives of people to contribute to the Swachh Bharat initiative. He also listed out the various measures taken by the government. He made special mention of the Arunachal Pradesh Airgun Surrender Campaign, a unique initiative in the northeastern state to halt the indiscriminate hunting of birds. People have surrendered about 1600 airguns, Modi said. The Prime Minister also spoke about efforts by individuals and institutions to promote Indian culture and protect ancient art forms from extinction. 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

  • ISHIKA SINGH 3314 Hrs 32 Min 01 Sec

    #IshikaSingh #Jv-u/19/3520 #Bpharm5thsem #JayotividyapeetwomensUniversity #Jvmission #As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS)GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacie .Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.s. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy .It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred Some parts of the media would have us believe that general practice has been effectively closed for business since the pandemic began. All of us in general practice, explains Sarah Jarvis, know the reality is very different indeed. As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department.In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit. Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate.

  • NEHA KUMARI 3314 Hrs 32 Min 25 Sec

    #Neha kumari#jv-u/21/5355#B-Pharma 1st sem#jayoti vidyapeeth women;s university#jv mission# community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicronAs the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support.

  • NAINA 3314 Hrs 32 Min 55 Sec

    #naina #jv-u/19/3041 #bpharmacy #5thsemester #jayotividyapeethwomensuniversity #jaipur #jvmission #community #pharmacy and primary health care to prevent #omicron #seven countries in #SouthEastAsia Region confirming cases of the new #COVID19 variant Omicron #Countries can and must prevent the spread of Omicron with the proven health and social measures #Protect yourself and protect each other #Get #vaccinated #wearamask #keepdistance open #windows #clean your hands and cough and sneeze safely Continue to take all precautions even after taking #vaccinedoses It is essential to mask yourself properly #take both doses of vaccines maintain #socialdistancing and maintain good #ventilation to the maximum possible # Keep a distance of at least 1 metre from others #The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus and how easily Omicron spreads compared to Delta remains unknown. CDC expects that anyone with Omicron infection can spread the virus to others, even if they are vaccinated or don’t have symptoms #CDC recommends that everyone 5 years and older protect themselves from COVID-19 by getting fully vaccinated #CDC provides advice about masks for people who want to learn more about what type of mask is right for them depending on their circumstances #Two types of tests are used to test for current infection: #nucleicacidamplificationtests (NAATs) and #antigentests. NAAT and antigen tests can only tell you if you have a current #infection #If your self-test has a positive result, stay home or isolate for 10 days, wear a mask if you have contact with others, and call your #healthcare provider # With other variants, like #Delta, #vaccines have remained effective at preventing severe #illness, #hospitalizations, and death. The recent emergence of Omicron further emphasizes the importance of vaccination and #boosters.# Get all of the doses and get boosted as well. In the meantime, social distance wherever possible, frequently sanitize your hands and surfaces you touch (like desks in conference rooms or classrooms), and wear a mask—especially in indoor areas with a lot of people or where there is poor ventilation. I suggest a disposable mask rather than a cloth one if youre able to obtain it.#Its important to maintain a #healthy diet and stay physically active, especially during this time #Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated or boosted ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, dont travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, dont go indoors with people youre not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, #thankyou

  • YASHVANI NARNOLIYA 3314 Hrs 33 Min 09 Sec

    #yashvini#bpharma#21148#j#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we

  • SHIVANI MISHRA 4 3314 Hrs 33 Min 13 Sec

    # shivani mishra # jv-u/19/3044 #b pharm 5 sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • ANAM NISHAT 3314 Hrs 33 Min 24 Sec

    #anam nishat khan #Jv-u/21/5076 #B.pharmacy1stsem.#Jayotividyapeetwomen"suniversity#Jvmission# #As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS)GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacie .Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.s. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy .It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred Some parts of the media would have us believe that general practice has been effectively closed for business since the pandemic began. All of us in general practice, explains Sarah Jarvis, know the reality is very different indeed. As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department.In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit. Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate.

  • MS. KHUSHBOO KUMAWAT 3314 Hrs 33 Min 33 Sec

    #PRITY KUMARI #Jv-u/19/3048 #B.pharmacy5thsem.#Jayotividyapeetwomen"suniversity#Jvmission# #As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS)GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacie .Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.s. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy .It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred Some parts of the media would have us believe that general practice has been effectively closed for business since the pandemic began. All of us in general practice, explains Sarah Jarvis, know the reality is very different indeed. As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department.In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit. Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate.

  • JANHAVI TIWARI 3314 Hrs 34 Min 15 Sec

    #janhavi 21253,bpharma1st semester,#jayoti vidyapeeth womens university#GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.

  • KHUSHI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 34 Min 31 Sec

    #madhu yadav#202563#b.pharm 3rd sem#jayoti vidyapeet women"s university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicronAs the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support

  • ANSHU GULIA 3314 Hrs 34 Min 43 Sec

    #Anshu gulia#jv-u/19/3444 #b pharm 5 sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • MS. KHUSHBOO KUMAWAT 3314 Hrs 35 Min 50 Sec

    #khushboo kumawat #Jv-u/19/3056 #B.pharmacy5thsem.#Jayotividyapeetwomen"suniversity#Jvmission# #As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS)GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacie .Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals.s. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy .It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred Some parts of the media would have us believe that general practice has been effectively closed for business since the pandemic began. All of us in general practice, explains Sarah Jarvis, know the reality is very different indeed. As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department.In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit. Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate.

  • NIKITA KUMAWAT 3314 Hrs 36 Min 10 Sec

    #nikita kumawat #jv-u/20/4112#b.pharma3rd sem.#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • SANTOSH KUMAWAT 3314 Hrs 36 Min 16 Sec

    #santoshkumawat#jv-u/20/4111#b.pharma;3rdsemester#jayoti vidyapeet women"s university jaipur#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicronAs the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate. Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referrals. How will it help general practice? It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back. How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support.

  • NAMRATA PARASHAR 3314 Hrs 36 Min 36 Sec

    #jvwu#b[pharma1year#namrata parashar #jv-u/21/5273 • On 26 November 2021, WHO designated the variant B.1.1.529 a variant of concern (VOC), on the basis of advice from WHO’s Technical Advisory Group on Virus Evolution. The variant has been given the name Omicron. • Omicron is a highly divergent variant with a high number of mutations, including 26-32 in the spike, some of which are concerning and may be associated with immune escape potential and higher transmissibility. However, there are still considerable uncertainties. • The main uncertainties are (1) how transmissible the variant is and whether any increases are related to immune escape, intrinsic increased transmissibility, or both; (2) how well vaccines protect against infection, transmission, clinical disease of different degrees of severity and death; and (3) does the variant present with a different severity profile. Public health advice is based on current information and will be tailored as more evidence emerges around those key question• Enhance surveillance and sequencing efforts to better understand circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants, including Omicron. Where capacity exists, perform field investigations and laboratory assessments to improve understanding of the characteristics of Omicron. This should include community testing to detect if Omicron is circulating in the community. • As S gene target failure (SGTF) from a widely used PCR test (ThermoFisher TaqPath) is indicated for Omicron, the SGTF can be used as the marker for this variant, which may lead to efficient detection of Omicron. • Report initial cases/clusters associated with Omicron infection to WHO through the IHR mechanism o Thereafter, report (publicly or through IHR) the relative prevalence of Omicron as the number of sequences of Omicron (numerator) divided by the total number of sequences generated through routine surveillance (denominator) and/or, https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fimages.indianexpress.com%2F2021%2F12%2Fbangalore-Covid-1-1.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Findianexpress.com%2Farticle%2Fcities%2Fbangalore%2Fbangalore-news-live-karnataka-omicron-weather-basavaraj-bommai-7681044%2F&tbnid=zHC3F-C5pAU-2M&vet=12ahUKEwji-JS5q6n1AhWJzzgGHbt7A_IQMygHegQIARAn..i&docid=xj6cET_q60ePgM&w=1200&h=667&itg=1&q=primary%20awareness%20for%20omicron&ved=2ahUKEwji-JS5q6n1AhWJzzgGHbt7A_IQMygHegQIARAn

  • KHUSHI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 37 Min 01 Sec

    #madhu yadav#202563#B.pharma(3thsem)#JayotiVidyapeethWomensUniversity#JvMission#As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programmed, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programmed. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalize the service or were actively making referrals.It is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realize that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Omicron COVID Variant Symptoms: On 24 November 2021 (Wednesday) a new COVID Variant was identified in South Africa. The new COVID Variant is named Omicron, WHO or World Health Organization has designated the new COVID Variant as the Variant of concern. After knowing that a new variant of COVID has been identified, the whole world is not panicking about this. Through this article, you will get the detailed information about the Omicron COVID Variant‘s.

  • KHUSHI SHARMA 3314 Hrs 38 Min 56 Sec

    #madhu yadav#202563#b pharm 3 sem#jayoti vidhyapeeth womens university#jv mission#community pharmacy and primary heath care to prevent omicronAs pressures on primary care start to bite, an innovative way of working with community pharmacy might be just what the doctor ordered.As the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings.One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS).GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day and is widely used to refer patients contacting 111 with minor illness queries to local community pharmacies. The service allows GP teams to refer patients presenting with minor illnesses directly for a consultation with their local community pharmacy, where appropriate.Given that it is a condition of the Winter Access Funding that practices sign up to deliver CPCS, primary care networks (PCNs) are developing plans for increasing appropriate referrals through to community pharmacies via the GP CPCS. In October 2021, about 44 per cent of GP practices were planning to operationalise the service or were actively making referralsIt is estimated that 6 per cent of all GP consultations (20.4 million appointments per year), could be safely managed by a community pharmacist. Offering these patients a formal referral to, and appointment with, a community pharmacist can allow them to be seen more quickly than if they waited for a GP appointment. Appointment time freed up can be used to see patients with more complex medical needs. There is good evidence that advice provided by community pharmacists about minor illness results in the same outcome as if the patient went to see their GP or attended an emergency department. In my own area, we have definitely seen an increase in consultation rates for minor illnesses in the last few months. So many patients dont realise that a pharmacist can supply many of the same medications for minor illness they would get on prescription from a GP. Nor do they know that pharmacists are highly trained to deal with minor illnesses. As a consequence, receptionists often find themselves pushing against an open door when they explain to the patient that they will usually be able to get a consultation much more quickly with a pharmacist than with a GP. When I speak to patients who have previously used CPCS, almost without exception they sing its praises. It really has made a positive difference to receptionists to have another service to offer patients, reducing the need to tell patients to call back.How it works When a patient with minor illness symptoms contacts their GP practice requesting an appointment, the care navigator or receptionist can refer them directly to a local pharmacist of their choice. Brief structured symptom checklists can help identify patients who can be safely referred. With the patient’s consent, the practice team can send an electronic referral message to the pharmacy the patient has chosen, to support safe follow up and audit.Following the referral, the patient can be advised to contact the pharmacy and sent details of their referral electronically. If they do not make contact, the pharmacist will contact the patient within 12 hours by phone and either carry out the consultation by telephone or arrange a video consultation or for the patient to attend the pharmacy, if appropriate. Somerset CCG is in the early stages of embedding CPCS across the whole county using local services (currently known as Patient Access Connect), which provides an integrated triage tool and automated referral to any participating pharmacy. It is already seeing huge success. Between June and September 2021, around 2,500 patients were successfully referred for a personal consultation with a community pharmacist of their choice.For Ed Garvey, who is part of the CCG’s primary care team, having the option to assess a patient referral using a clinically-designed assessment tool means that “receptionists and practice teams have the added confidence that they can refer to this tool when they need some reassurance.”GP Dr Jeremy Imms has remarked on the “huge cost saving to the practice, as each referral is saving a clinician’s appointment. By broadening access to the wider primary care, patients are getting a better service and we are taking a little bit of pressure out of GP surgeries.” For Michael Lennox, a community pharmacist in Somerset, the CPCS service is “beginning to make a discernible difference in channel shift. We are convinced that our partnership-working philosophy has enabled us to achieve at-pace and best-in-class practical delivery.” Implementing the CPCSPractices can start referring into the CPCS straight away, as soon as the secure electronic referral process has been agreed with local community pharmacies. There is lots of support available through your local implementation lead or on FutureNHS. EMIS practices wishing to use local services can contact their local EMIS team.

  • AYIMA KARIM 3314 Hrs 39 Min 03 Sec

    #Ayina karim#jv-u/19/3047#B-Pharma 5th sem#jayoti vidyapeeth women;s university#jv mission# community pharmacy and primary health care to prevent omicronAs the NHS approaches another winter, primary care will be dealing with an expanded booster programme, business-as-usual GP appointments, additional winter pressures and a bigger-than-ever annual flu vaccination programme. All this adds up to huge pressure on appointments – and thats before weve even factored in the uncertainty the Omicron variant brings. One innovative way we can ease pressures on primary care is to encourage general practices to implement the GP Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS). What is the GP CPCS? GP CPCS offers patients minor illness consultations with a community pharmacist within one working day an